agriculture agriculture

Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences students Liz Hada, left, and Melissa Garcia Rodriguez say they have experienced racial tension in some of their classes, despite feeling generally welcomed by most students and faculty. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen attends the 2017 Agriculture Fair on Tuesday in Paris. Christophe Ena/AP hide caption

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Christophe Ena/AP

In A Heated Campaign Season, French Politicians Flock To Paris Farm Fair

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Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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A natural gas drilling rig's lights shimmer in the evening light near Silt, Colo. Methane is the main component of natural gas, and studies show some methane escapes from leaky oil and gas operations. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Methane's On The Rise, But Regulations To Stop Gas Leaks Still Debated

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Climate change has made summers in Greenland warmer and drier, leading to a decline in the number of sheep farms on the island. Peter Essick/Aurora Creative/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Essick/Aurora Creative/Getty Images

Farmer Daniele Pacicca in the Calabria region of southern Italy shows the stumps of his 13 olive trees that were hacked down this summer. With the help of GOEL Bio, he was able to replace them with twice as many new trees, 26. Chris Livesay for NPR hide caption

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Chris Livesay for NPR

'Tough Guy' Farmers Stand Up To Italian Mafia — And Win

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Justino DeLeon, 58, stands in front of his home in Pharr, Texas. A former watermelon picker; he retired from farm work when he fell off a melon truck and hurt his arm. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

In South Texas, Fair Wages Elude Farmworkers, 50 Years After Historic Strike

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