agriculture agriculture

Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

The Soybean Is King, Yet Remains Invisible

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Chip Councell's ancestors began farming on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1690. He says that in today's world, U.S. farmers have to look abroad for markets. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

As Trump Moves To Renegotiate NAFTA, U.S. Farmers Are Hopeful But Nervous

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A worker milking cows at a farm in Manati, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Puerto Rico's dairy farmers account for about a third of the island's total agricultural production. Now they're struggling to recover their cows and get them milked. Courtesy of Manuel Perez hide caption

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Courtesy of Manuel Perez

Puerto Rico's Dairy Industry, Once Robust, Flattened By Maria

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Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

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Molly Solomon/OPB

Fallen fruit sits on the ground below orange trees in Frostproof, Fla., U.S. Hurricane Irma destroyed almost half of the citrus crop in some areas. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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Children walk through a rice field outside the town of Kelilalina in eastern Madagascar. Rice is the dominant food and the dominant crop on the Indian Ocean island, but changing weather patterns are disrupting production in some parts of the country. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Erratic Weather Threatens Livelihood Of Rice Farmers In Madagascar

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The teal blue area along the Louisiana coastline represents a "dead zone" of oxygen-depleted water. Resulting from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi River, it can potentially hurt fisheries. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen

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Dead Canary Islands date palms, killed by red palm weevils, line a road in La Mersa, Tunis, Tunisia. Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside