agriculture agriculture
Stories About

agriculture

A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer at DiMare Farms in Florida City, Fla., in 2013. The Trump administration is preparing to level a new tariff on fresh tomatoes imported from Mexico in response to complaints from Florida growers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Food Fight: Trump Administration Levels Tariffs On Mexican Tomatoes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721172201/721172224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697492255/701939274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers sort onions at a wholesale market in Maharashtra. The state is India's biggest onion producer. Prices have fallen drastically because of a surplus and fewer exports. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sushmita Pathak/NPR

'I Rue The Day We Ever Became Farmers': In Rural India, A Struggle To Survive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/687366916/693516542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Big Iron Farm Show draws thousands of farmers and farm equipment-makers to a fairground in West Fargo, N.D. For many this year, concerns about crop yields have been eclipsed by worries about President Trump's trade policies. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Zarroli/NPR

Farmers Hope For China Trade Deal, But For Now They Worry About Tariffs' Impact

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/647329088/647329089" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/642435250/643798758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/642646707/642871671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The vines at Pheasant Ridge Winery near Lubbock, Texas, were devastated by drift from the herbicide 2,4-D in 2016. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Merrit Kennedy/NPR

West Texas Vineyards Blasted By Herbicide Drift From Nearby Cotton Fields

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/638588456/640438014" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Urban/NPR

New technologies and a changing climate are altering the way apples are grown in places like New York's Hudson Valley and across the country. Jake Rajs/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Rajs/Getty Images

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634135514/635047840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tens of thousands of people live in villages on the edge of the Ankeniheny-Zahamena Corridor rainforest in Madagascar. A government policy now bans cutting down trees to get more land for farming. Mahesh Poudyal hide caption

toggle caption
Mahesh Poudyal

Cows stand in a pen at the Skyline Dairy farm near Grunthal, Manitoba, Canada, in March. Trevor Hagan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Trevor Hagan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why President Trump Hates Canadian Dairy — And Canada Insists On Protecting It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627271410/627955166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

Georgia's chicken prices were 30 to 50 percent higher than chicken prices elsewhere in 2015. Investors smelled a rat. Rob Lawson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Lawson/Getty Images

How Wall Street Brought Down Georgia's Suspicious Chicken Price Index

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611869606/611869611" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript