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In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

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The State Department in Washington, D.C., in 2014. A former ­office manager there was sentenced to 40 months in prison for concealing her exchanges with Chinese intelligence agents. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Luis M. Alvarez/AP

The State Department ordered "non-emergency" U.S. government employees out of Iraq on Wednesday. A helicopter carrying U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is seen taking off from Baghdad International Airport last week. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Elad Dvash-Banks (left) and his husband, Andrew, pose for photos with their twin sons, Ethan (center right), and Aiden in their apartment last year in Los Angeles. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Haitian police have struggled to control street protests as demonstrators call for President Jovenel Moise to resign over alleged misuse of the Petrocaribe fund. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's top prosecutor, Tarek William Saab, talks to reporters in Caracas on Tuesday. He announced that Juan Guaidó, now President Nicolás Maduro's most prominent opponent, is barred from leaving the country because of an investigation. Marco Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Bello/Getty Images

In this Dec. 12, 2012, file photo released by Korean Central News Agency, North Korea's Unha-3 rocket lifts off from the Sohae launch pad in Tongchang-ri, North Korea. In 2018, North Korea's government said it would destroy the facility. KCNA via AP hide caption

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KCNA via AP

Attorneys, from left, David Seligman, Nina DiSalvo and Alexander Hood of Denver's Towards Justice, which filed a lawsuit on behalf of au pairs for higher pay. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tells NPR that the U.S. remains committed to the Kurds, American allies in the Syrian war, even as the U.S. plans to withdraw troops from the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Despite Remaining ISIS Threats, Pompeo Says U.S. Made 'Caliphate In Syria Go Away'

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The State Department is implementing a policy denying visas to diplomats' same-sex partners if they're not legally married. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump, flanked by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (left) and Energy Secretary Rick Perry (right), announces the approval of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, in March 2017. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Blackwater security contractors guard Zalmay Khalilzad, then the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, as he arrives at a community sports center in Baghdad in 2006. Jacob Silberberg/AP hide caption

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Jacob Silberberg/AP

Zalmay Khalilzad Appointed As U.S. Special Adviser To Afghanistan

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