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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a community forum on health care at Moulton Elementary School in Des Moines, Iowa, on Tuesday. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP
Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Is A Containment Strategy Enough For Isis?

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Malaysia, Cuba Taken Off U.S. Human Trafficking Blacklist

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A glitch in the State Department's visa system has affected people around the world. Many, including athletes, workers and students, have been unable to enter the United States. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

State Department Computer Glitch Creates A Visa Nightmare

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An engraving of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington on April 14, 1865. Lincoln died the next day. De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images

Visitors to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum wait for it to reopen after widespread power outages caused many of the buildings along the National Mall in Washington to shut down temporarily on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her mobile phone in March 2012 after her address to the Security Council at United Nations headquarters. While she's asked the State Department to quickly release her emails from her tenure as secretary, the process likely will take months — dragging out media coverage and critical questions. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Clinton, White House Play Delicate Dance As Emails Await Release

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