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Stephen Moore speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. He withdrew from consideration for a seat on the Federal Reserve Board, President Trump said. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump said on Friday that he will nominate conservative TV commentator and former Trump campaign adviser Stephen Moore to the Federal Reserve Board. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Economists Forecast Stephen Moore Wouldn't Be Good For Fed Post

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Stephen Moore, a conservative commentator and former Trump campaign adviser, has joined the president in criticizing the Federal Reserve. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Feb. 26. "It may be some time before the outlook for jobs and inflation calls clearly for a change in policy," he said Wednesday. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Even the Federal Reserve has noticed ghosting, which it defines as "a situation where a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact." Planet Flem/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Flem/Getty Images

In A Hot Labor Market, Some Employees Are 'Ghosting' Bad Bosses

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Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lael Brainard says a growing body of research suggests that diversity leads to better decision-making. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

The Push To Break Up The Boys' Club At The Fed

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Shoppers walk past a Saks Fifth Avenue outlet store in Miami on Black Friday. Millennials have lower earnings, fewer assets and less wealth, a new Federal Reserve study says. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

In a speech to the Economic Club of New York on Wednesday, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said interest rates are just below the range of estimates that would be "neutral" for the economy. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell, seen before a Senate committee hearing in July. The Fed announced another interest rate bump Wednesday on the strength of a healthy economy. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump answers a question during a Reuters interview in the Oval Office on Monday. The president again criticized the Fed for raising interest rates. Leah Millis/Reuters hide caption

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Leah Millis/Reuters

Led by Chairman Jerome Powell, the Federal Reserve held steady with no rate increase, but it is expected to raise rates twice more by the end of the year. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Workers weld drawers on the assembly line at the Metal Box International toolbox factory in Franklin Park, Ill. Many analysts estimate that U.S. economic growth picked up in the second quarter. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

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Tim Aeppel/Reuters

How Fast Did The Economy Grow? Forecasts Are All Over The Place

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President Trump looks on as his nominee for Federal Reserve chairman, Jerome Powell, speaks at the White House on Nov. 2. On Thursday, Trump said he is "not thrilled" about Fed interest rate hikes. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump Slams Interest Rate Hikes, Ignoring Hands-Off Tradition Toward Fed

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