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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the Fed cut rates to "help keep the U.S. economy strong in the face of some notable developments and to provide insurance against ongoing risks." Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Fed Cuts Interest Rates To Prop Up The Slowing Economy

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Karmi Mattson, the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank's manager of public programs, says she and her colleagues are at the state fair to teach Minnesotans about what the Fed does. Mark Zdechlik/MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR News

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday that the central bank "will act as appropriate to sustain" the U.S. economic expansion. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell has been under pressure from President Trump to cut interest rates. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Fed Cuts Interest Rates For 1st Time Since 2008

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference on May 1 in Washington, D.C. He is testifying before Congress this week about economic challenges. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Fed Chairman Powell Hints At Interest Rate Cut; Stocks Rally

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Stephen Moore speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. He withdrew from consideration for a seat on the Federal Reserve Board, President Trump said. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Trump said on Friday that he will nominate conservative TV commentator and former Trump campaign adviser Stephen Moore to the Federal Reserve Board. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Economists Forecast Stephen Moore Wouldn't Be Good For Fed Post

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Stephen Moore, a conservative commentator and former Trump campaign adviser, has joined the president in criticizing the Federal Reserve. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Feb. 26. "It may be some time before the outlook for jobs and inflation calls clearly for a change in policy," he said Wednesday. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

Even the Federal Reserve has noticed ghosting, which it defines as "a situation where a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact." Planet Flem/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Flem/Getty Images

In A Hot Labor Market, Some Employees Are 'Ghosting' Bad Bosses

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Federal Reserve Board Gov. Lael Brainard says a growing body of research suggests that diversity leads to better decision-making. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

The Push To Break Up The Boys' Club At The Fed

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Shoppers walk past a Saks Fifth Avenue outlet store in Miami on Black Friday. Millennials have lower earnings, fewer assets and less wealth, a new Federal Reserve study says. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP