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Angela Pike watches her fourth grade students at Lakewood Elementary School in Cecilia, Ky., as they use their laptops to participate in an emotional check-in at the start of the school day, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

A villager brings a yak into the classroom so the new teacher will understand how important the animals are to the village of nomadic yak herders. Yak dung is important too — used to warm homes. Samuel Goldwyn Films hide caption

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Samuel Goldwyn Films

California Gov. Gavin Newsom appears at a news conference in Oakland, Calif., on July 26. On Wednesday, he announced that the state's teachers and school staff will be required to be vaccinated for COVID-19 or undergo weekly testing. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

A health care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine last week at West Philadelphia High School in Philadelphia. Dr. Anthony Fauci says he backs mandatory vaccines for teachers, citing a "critical situation" in the country. Hannah Beier/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Beier/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rimrock Junior/Senior High School in Bruneau, Idaho. Despite recent outbreaks that forced temporary closures, the Bruneau-Grand View school board in Idaho voted down a mask mandate in November. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

A Rural School Under Pressure To Stay Open: 'People Are Just ... Rough And Tough'

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Pre-school teacher Mikki Laugier, right, guides students in a lesson as they participate in an outdoor learning demonstration to display methods schools can use to continue on-site education during the coronavirus pandemic, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, at P.S. 15 in the Red Hook neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

The view outside the Chinese technology company ByteDance in Beijing in August 2020. Trump's executive order outlaws transactions between U.S. citizens and ByteDance. American instructors who work for ByteDance subsidiary GOGOKID said they feel like their jobs are under threat. Emmanuel Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Wong/Getty Images

They Teach Chinese Kids English Online. Now They're Caught In Trump's War On TikTok

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Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, says the union would support "safety strikes" by teachers if safety measures are not met when schools are set to reopen in the fall. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd died after testing positive for coronavirus. Other teachers she worked with tested positive as well. "She was a very loving, very faithful person and she was very kind," says her colleague Jena Martinez-Inzunza. Luke Byrd hide caption

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Luke Byrd

A Teacher Who Contracted COVID-19 Cautions Against In-Person Schooling

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Sam Smith, Brittany Smith and their daughter Erelah outside their Charlotte home. The Smiths moved to Charlotte looking for change and opportunity. They are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg County, where the African American population has ballooned by 64% since 2000. Swikar Patel for NPR hide caption

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Swikar Patel for NPR

As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

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Libsack says she's now feeling "hopeful" because her government finally listened. "For me, as a teacher, it's awesome," she says, "because then I can convey that to the students and say, 'Hey, you do have a voice. You are citizens. You do have a role in our government.' " Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

Teachers Begin To See Unfair Student Loans Disappear

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Thousands of public school teachers and their supporters protested against a pension reform bill at the Kentucky state Capitol in April. The state's Supreme Court has now struck down the law. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
Lily Padula for NPR

Exclusive: Ed Department To Erase Debts Of Teachers, Fix Troubled Grant Program

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Senators To DeVos On TEACH Grant Debacle: 'Urgent That These Mistakes Are Fixed'

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Travis Brenda is a math teacher at Rockcastle County High School who ousted Jonathan Shell in a primary election Tuesday. Shell is a key member of the Republican leadership team that has orchestrated the teacher pension bill, the tax increases and the charter school bill. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

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Wade Payne/AP

The digital marquee outside Highland Arts Elementary School in Mesa, Ariz., seen at the start of class Wednesday, warns of the effects of the teacher walkout on Thursday. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP