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Luann McVey holds a sign before the start of a rally held in support of the Alaska university system on Feb. 13 in Juneau, Alaska. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Becky Bohrer/AP

University Of Alaska Readies For Budget Slash: 'We May Likely Never Recover'

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A reindeer calf scratches its head with its hoof. Their ability to move their bodies into extreme positions was one of the reasons owner Jane Atkinson thought that reindeer would be a good fit for a yoga class. Ravenna Koenig/KTOO hide caption

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Ravenna Koenig/KTOO

Move Over, Goat Yoga. Alaskans Now Have Reindeer Yoga

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A dead whale at the mouth of the Placer River, at the eastern end of the Turnagain Arm, near Anchorage, Alaska. The deaths of at least 60 whales along the Pacific Coast this year have scientists concerned and looking for answers. Nat Herz /Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Nat Herz /Alaska's Energy Desk

Why Are Gray Whales Dying? Researchers Cut Through The Blubber For Answers

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Fishing boats sit in the harbor in Homer, Alaska. Women make up about 15% of commercial fishermen, and say sexual harassment is all too common. Renee Gross/KBBI News hide caption

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Renee Gross/KBBI News

'Get Off The Boat' — Women In Commercial Fishing Industry Fight Sexual Harassment

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Robert Melovidov, a tribal council member, holds up fur seal meat that he's preparing to cook in his home on St. Paul Island. Nathaniel Herz/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Nathaniel Herz/Alaska Public Media

Iced over equipment at the Tin City radar site overlooking the Bering Strait and Seward Peninsula. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

How Climate Change Is Affecting Alaska's Military Radar Stations

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For the 2010 census, the Census Bureau director took a dog sled to complete his trip to Noorvik, Alaska. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Why The U.S. Census Starts In Alaska's Most Remote, Rural Villages

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A Mountaineer Writes A Firsthand Report From The World's Melting Glaciers

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In Alaska, 'Righteous Rage' Over Sexual Assault

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

A basketball hoop stands near boats buried in the winter snow. Shishmaref, Alaska, is just a few dozen miles below the Arctic Circle, and in the depths of winter the sun rises close to noon. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Alaska Native Tannery Is Bringing Seal Back

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Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

The Conflicting Educations Of Sam Schimmel

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The Permafrost Tunnel Research Facility, dug in the mid-1960s, allows scientists a three-dimensional look at frozen ground. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

Is There A Ticking Time Bomb Under The Arctic?

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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In this undated photo, caribou from the Porcupine Caribou Herd migrate onto the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. The refuge takes up an area nearly the size of South Carolina in Alaska's northeast corner. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP

During a storm, the Alaskan village of Newtok can lose 10 to 20 feet of tundra. Erosion is getting worse because of warming temperatures and record low sea ice. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk

For Alaskan Coastal Village, Erosion Hits Home

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Tax Bill Would Open Alaska Wildlife Refuge To Drilling

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