Alaska Alaska

Tax Bill Would Open Alaska Wildlife Refuge To Drilling

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Seafood processors like Ocean Beauty are some of the largest energy consumers in Kodiak, Alaska, which has generated more than 99 percent of its electricity from renewable sources since 2014. Here, the Ocean Beauty seafood plant. Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

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Needles at the Alaska AIDS Assistance Association syringe exchange in Anchorage. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Syringe Exchange Program Aims To Slow Hepatitis C Infections In Alaska

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Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, in the Capitol on Wednesday, was one of two Republicans to vote against opening debate on the health care bill on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Judah (left) and Josh Ridgeway drill a hole in the Tanana River at Nenana, Alaska to measure the thickness of the ice on April 13th. Dan Bross/KUAC hide caption

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Dan Bross/KUAC

Alaska Guessing Game Provides Climate Change Record

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A BP oil well near Deadhorse, Alaska was misting natural gas on Alaska's frozen North Slope on Saturday. The Alaska Department of Conservation said on Monday that a team of workers had successfully stopped the leak. U.S. EPA/AP hide caption

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U.S. EPA/AP

Matt Kern harvests wild bull kelp for salsa that he and his partner, Lisa Heifetz, are selling as part of his new business. Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz

Mitch Seavey poses with his lead dogs Pilot, left, and Crisp under the Burled Arch after winning the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, in Nome, Alaska, on Tuesday. Seavey won his third Iditarod, becoming the fastest and oldest champion at age 57. Diana Haecker/AP hide caption

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Diana Haecker/AP

On one Alaskan island, reindeer have eaten the lichen faster than it could regrow. They're now digging up roots and grazing on grass. Courtesy of Paul Melovidov hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Melovidov

When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging

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Days before this week's Alaska Forum on the Environment, the EPA said it was sending half of the people who had planned to attend. The nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President Trump's pick to head the EPA, is still pending confirmation. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The Ninglick River is eating away at the shoreline in Newtok, Alaska, shown here in August 2016. Engineers estimate the village is losing 70 feet of land per year. Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk

Alaskan Village, Citing Climate Change, Seeks Disaster Relief In Order To Relocate

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A resident of the town formerly known as Barrow, Alaska, rides her motorcycle along an Arctic Ocean beach in 2005. The town is now officially called Utqiagvik, its Inupiaq name. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

How To Pronounce Utqiagvik

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Dennis Pungowiyi sells his ivory carvings at a craft fair during the annual Alaska Federation of Natives conference. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Ivory Ban Hurts Alaska Natives Who Legally Carve Walrus Tusks

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Many glaciers are melting in Alaska. Scientists believe climate change is at work. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Climate Change: The Forgotten Issue Of This Year's Election

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A video from the Bureau of Land Management-Alaska Facebook page showed a mysterious object moving in the Chena River. The BLM called it an "Ice Monster." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

The Anchorage Police Department captured video of a black bear roaming the city's streets. Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR hide caption

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Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR