Alaska Alaska

Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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In this undated photo, caribou from the Porcupine Caribou Herd migrate onto the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. The refuge takes up an area nearly the size of South Carolina in Alaska's northeast corner. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP

During a storm, the Alaskan village of Newtok can lose 10 to 20 feet of tundra. Erosion is getting worse because of warming temperatures and record low sea ice. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska's Energy Desk

For Alaskan Coastal Village, Erosion Hits Home

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Tax Bill Would Open Alaska Wildlife Refuge To Drilling

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Belinda Batten of Oregon State University stands in front of a wave energy generator prototype. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Oceans May Host Next Wave Of Renewable Energy

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Dallas Seavey poses with his lead dogs Reef (left) and Tide after finishing the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, in March 2016. Seavey denies he administered banned drugs to his dogs in this year's race and has withdrawn from the 2018 race in protest. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Seafood processors like Ocean Beauty are some of the largest energy consumers in Kodiak, Alaska, which has generated more than 99 percent of its electricity from renewable sources since 2014. Here, the Ocean Beauty seafood plant. Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

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Needles at the Alaska AIDS Assistance Association syringe exchange in Anchorage. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Syringe Exchange Program Aims To Slow Hepatitis C Infections In Alaska

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Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, in the Capitol on Wednesday, was one of two Republicans to vote against opening debate on the health care bill on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Judah (left) and Josh Ridgeway drill a hole in the Tanana River at Nenana, Alaska to measure the thickness of the ice on April 13th. Dan Bross/KUAC hide caption

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Dan Bross/KUAC

Alaska Guessing Game Provides Climate Change Record

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A BP oil well near Deadhorse, Alaska was misting natural gas on Alaska's frozen North Slope on Saturday. The Alaska Department of Conservation said on Monday that a team of workers had successfully stopped the leak. U.S. EPA/AP hide caption

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U.S. EPA/AP

Matt Kern harvests wild bull kelp for salsa that he and his partner, Lisa Heifetz, are selling as part of his new business. Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz