Alaska Alaska

On one Alaskan island, reindeer have eaten the lichen faster than it could regrow. They're now digging up roots and grazing on grass. Courtesy of Paul Melovidov hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Melovidov

When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging

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Days before this week's Alaska Forum on the Environment, the EPA said it was sending half of the people who had planned to attend. The nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President Trump's pick to head the EPA, is still pending confirmation. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The Ninglick River is eating away at the shoreline in Newtok, Alaska, shown here in August 2016. Engineers estimate the village is losing 70 feet of land per year. Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk

Alaskan Village, Citing Climate Change, Seeks Disaster Relief In Order To Relocate

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A resident of the town formerly known as Barrow, Alaska, rides her motorcycle along an Arctic Ocean beach in 2005. The town is now officially called Utqiagvik, its Inupiaq name. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

How To Pronounce Utqiagvik

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Dennis Pungowiyi sells his ivory carvings at a craft fair during the annual Alaska Federation of Natives conference. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Ivory Ban Hurts Alaska Natives Who Legally Carve Walrus Tusks

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Many glaciers are melting in Alaska. Scientists believe climate change is at work. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Climate Change: The Forgotten Issue Of This Year's Election

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A video from the Bureau of Land Management-Alaska Facebook page showed a mysterious object moving in the Chena River. The BLM called it an "Ice Monster." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

The Anchorage Police Department captured video of a black bear roaming the city's streets. Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR hide caption

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Anchorage Police Department/Screen Shot by NPR

The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

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"An Old Walrus, Or 'Morse' " was drawn by Henry Wood Elliott in 1872. He included it in his book Our Arctic Province, next to a description of a walrus haulout in Alaska's Punuk Islands in 1874. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Light shines on the mountains behind the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska. Guides are using the glacier's rapid retreat as a stark lesson on the effects of climate change. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Becky Bohrer/AP

Visitors To A Shrinking Alaskan Glacier Get A Lesson On Climate Change

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Many glaciers are melting in Alaska. Scientists believe climate change is at work. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Why Our Brains Weren't Made To Deal With Climate Change

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