European Union European Union

A poultry processing plant in France. Europe banned treating chicken carcasses with chlorine in the 1990s out of fear that it could cause cancer. Christophe Di Pascale/Corbis hide caption

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Christophe Di Pascale/Corbis

European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

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Ukrainian lawmakers applaud a televised address by the President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz (on screen) in the Ukrainian parliament on Tuesday in Kiev. The parliament voted to strengthen trade ties with the EU, but not until 2016. Sergey Dolzhenko/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Sergey Dolzhenko/EPA/Landov

On the sidelines of the EU summit in Brussels, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron said the choice of Jean-Claude Juncker to head the European Commission marks "a bad day for Europe." John Thys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, who signed a new economic deal with the EU at the organization's summit meetings Friday. Olivier Hoslet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Hoslet/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama speaks during a joint news conference with Philippine President Benigno Aquino III at Malacanang Palace in Manila, Philippines, on Monday. Obama said the U.S. and EU were planning new economic sanctions against Russia. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

As Russian soldiers walked one way in the distance, a departing Ukrainian soldier carried some of his belongings Friday at a military base in Perevalne, Crimea. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Cheese, glorious cheese! The European Union wants U.S. food makers to stop using names with historical ties to Europe. But what else would you call, say, Parmesan and Brie? Dinner Series/Flickr hide caption

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Dinner Series/Flickr

Europe Tells U.S. To Lay Off Brie And Get Its Own Cheese Names

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