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Artist William Stoehr says he wants his portraits to show that addiction affects everyone, and to prompt the sort of conversations that people began having about HIV/AIDS decades ago. William Stoehr hide caption

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William Stoehr

An Artist And A Scientist Take On The Stigma Of Addiction

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Iraq Mihaela Noroc/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Mihaela Noroc/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

PHOTOS: A 4-Year Mission To Present A New Vision Of Beauty

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Eunice, pictured above, is one of the workshop participants: "Today I learned a girl can do anything — that a boy and girl are equal, no one is more special, and I am happy about it. I am happy that the new things I learned today [are] to be confident and be powerful." Mercy/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation hide caption

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Mercy/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation

Winston Churchill was so displeased with Graham Sutherland's portrait that his wife asked his secretary to destroy it. Pictured here is a preparatory sketch. Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London hide caption

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Reprinted from "The Face of Britain" by Simon Schama with permission from Oxford University Press/National Portrait Gallery, London

'The Face Of Britain' Tells A Nation's History Through Portraits

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Robert Duncan poses with his wife, Karen, for New York photographer Iké Udé. Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan hide caption

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Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

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