NAFTA NAFTA

President Trump meets with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, in July. Trump is pushing to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement among their countries and Canada. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump's NAFTA Makeover Not So Extreme

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A Gelbvieh cow and her calf on a ranch in Paradise Valley, Mont. From Montana cattle ranchers to Florida tomato growers, some bruised by NAFTA think it has favored agribusiness over small-scale farms, lowered environmental standards and made it harder to compete against cheaper imports. William Campbell/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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William Campbell/Corbis/Getty Images

National Trade Council Director Peter Navarro says the U.S. needs to unwind "bad" trade agreements and strike new ones that would prevent such practices. He says the administration is off to a good start. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Peter Navarro: A 'Bricklayer' Of Trump's Protectionist Wall

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Trucks line up to cross to the United States near the Otay Commercial port of entry on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border on Jan. 25. Trump now says he will renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he has long criticized, rather than scrap it. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

The avocados on the right are Hass, America's favorite variety of the green fruit. At left are GEM avocados, the great-granddaughter of the Hass. GEM avocados grow well in California's Central Valley and, in taste tests, they scored better than the Hass in terms of eating quality. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Scenes from inside greenhouse No. 2 at Wholesum Farms Sonora. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Amid Talk Of Tariffs, What Happens To Companies That Straddle The Border?

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Homeland Security chief John Kelly (from left), Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and Mexican Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong spoke with reporters after initial meetings in Mexico City Thursday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walk down the West Wing Colonnade between meetings at the White House Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Talks Trade, Immigration In First Meeting With Trump

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It's hard to find a place in Mexico more transformed by the North American Free Trade Agreement than Tijuana. The border city has exploded in growth since the trade pact was signed in 1993. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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As Trump Threatens To Ditch NAFTA, Tijuana Residents Face Uncertainty

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The Dow Jones Railroad Index has climbed about 25 percent since the election, but many U.S. companies have cross-border trade accounts that could be affected by policy changes that President Donald Trump might make regarding the North American Free Trade Agreement. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

U.S. Companies Uncertain Of NAFTA Trading Under Trump Administration

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Trade delegates pose for a photograph after signing the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement in Auckland, New Zealand, earlier this year. The deal is expected to be in the crosshairs of President-elect Donald Trump. David Rowland/AP hide caption

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David Rowland/AP

Activists hold a rally to protest the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement in front of the White House on Feb. 3. Trade has become a key issue in the U.S. presidential campaign. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help "fill the void" being created by rising demand for meat in countries like Singapore through the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Allie Caulfield/Flickr hide caption

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Allie Caulfield/Flickr

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approach the podiums for a joint press conference Tuesday at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Obama is hoping to finalize a new trade agreement with Japan and other Asian nations soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Obama Confident In Asia Trade Pact, But Track Record For Deals Is Spotty

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President Obama talks with Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak at the East Asia Summit in Myanmar in November. Obama is trying to strike a 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would include Malaysia. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images