FDA : Shots - Health News FDA

One teaspoon of pure caffeine powder delivers about the same jolt as 25 cups of coffee. The Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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The Center for Science in the Public Interest

Potent Powdered Caffeine Raises Safety Worries

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The problem isn't just that fake cures are worthless, doctors say. Fraudulent claims also give some people the false sense that the product can protect them from getting sick. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

FDA Cracks Down On Fake Ebola Cures Sold Online

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Even versions of Zi Xiu Tang Bee Pollen labeled "genuine" and "anti-counterfeit" have been found to contain the drug sibutramine, which was supposed to come off the U.S. market in 2010 for safety reasons. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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Food and Drug Administration

Banned Drugs Still Turning Up In Weight-Loss Supplements

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The newly approved Harvoni tablets bring several advances to the fight against hepatitis C, but they also have a steep price tag, reported at $1,125 for a single dose. Gilead Sciences hide caption

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Gilead Sciences

Traditional warning labels on medicine boxes tend to be long on confusing language, critics say, but short on helpful numbers. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

How Well Does A Drug Work? Look Beyond The Fine Print

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Antidepressant use nationally fell by 31 percent among adolescents between 2000 and 2010. Suicide attempts increased by almost 22 percent. JustinLing/Flickr hide caption

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JustinLing/Flickr

Warnings Against Antidepressants For Teens May Have Backfired

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