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"There's a certain notion that e-cigarettes are harmless," says Dr. Paul Ndunda, an assistant professor at the School of Medicine at the University of Kansas in Wichita. "But ... while they're less harmful than normal cigarettes, their use still comes with risks." RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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RyanJLane/Getty Images

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said he wants to ban menthol cigarettes because teenagers often become addicted to nicotine by smoking them. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FDA Seeks Ban On Menthol Cigarettes To Fight Teen Smoking

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Nicotine, heavy metals and tiny particles that can harm the lungs have been found in e-cigarette aerosol, according to the surgeon general. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Scientists are finding that, just as with secondhand smoke from tobacco, inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana can make it harder for arteries to expand to allow a healthy flow of blood. Maren Caruso/Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Caruso/Getty Images

Are There Risks From Secondhand Marijuana Smoke? Early Science Says Yes

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Vapor from e-cigarettes contains toxins, although fewer than conventional cigarettes. mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

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The state of New York is putting e-cigarettes into the same category as regular tobacco cigarettes, under new restrictions signed into law this week. Here, a man uses a vape device in London last summer, next to a No Smoking sign. Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

Because a high pH level makes cigars fairly alkaline, consuming tart candies like Skittles or Starbursts can help neutralize the palate. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR

For three years recreational pot has been legal in Colorado, but using it in public is still against the law. That will change this summer when pot cafes are slated to open. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

As Colorado Gets Ready To Allow Pot Clubs, Indoor Smoking Still An Issue

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The highly rated variety of medical marijuana known as "Blue Dream" was displayed among other strains at a cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles in 2014. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In

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Cartons of cigarettes on shelves at Discount Smoke Shop in Ballwin, Mo., in 2012 were much cheaper than cigarettes in most other states. Missouri's tobacco tax is still only 17 cents per pack, but will rise if either of two state ballot measures passes this month. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Why Tobacco Companies Are Spending Millions To Boost A Cigarette Tax

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A scene from the elevator's security video, which shows the assailant repeatedly hitting the woman after she says she had asked him to stop smoking. People's Daily of China via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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People's Daily of China via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

A sculpture of a cigarette butt inside Paris' Gare de Lyon railway station in 2012. France's Parliament sought to crack down on health hazards at the time. Another attempt is currently underway to curb smoking, which remains high among French teens. Remy de la Mauviniere/AP hide caption

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Remy de la Mauviniere/AP

For French Teens, Smoking Still Has More Allure Than Stigma

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News Assistant Max Nesterak tries to quit smoking using social science research. Hugo Rojo/NPR hide caption

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Hugo Rojo/NPR

Can Social Science Help You Quit Smoking For Good?

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California is the second state to raise the legal age for purchasing tobacco products from 18 to 21. A similar law went into effect in Hawaii on Jan. 1. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Going slow isn't necessarily the best route to ditching cigarettes. Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images

To Quit Smoking, It's Best To Go Cold Turkey

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A fake anti-smoking ad in Moscow reads: "Smoking kills more people than Obama, although he kills a lot of people. Don't smoke! Don't be like Obama!" Dmitry Gudkov/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Dmitry Gudkov/Screenshot by NPR

Russian Pranksters Feature Obama In Fake Anti-Smoking Ad

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