smoking smoking

We're using social science to help our News Assistant Max Nesterak quit smoking. Basil Arteomov/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Basil Arteomov/Flickr

Why It's Not Too Late To Make A New Year's Resolution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463220298/463230244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bupropion, sold under the name Wellbutrin, is an antidepressant often prescribed to help a person quit smoking. Michelle Del Guercio/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Michelle Del Guercio/Science Source

E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/452277042/452466419" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman smokes a cigarette in a Beijing shopping market, even though the practice is now banned inside public spaces. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

How Does A City Stop 4 Million Smokers From Lighting Up?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413318065/413318066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Corbis

Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/406459255/406505254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Daniel Gomez (from left), Lister Sena and Ricardo Alvarez were laid off after working for years with Philip Morris in Uruguay. They are now inspectors enforcing the country's tough anti-smoking laws. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

Once Philip Morris Workers, Now They Clamp Down On Uruguay's Smokers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/404557478/405125560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Family Secrets Make You Sick?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377569413/390245045" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tobacco smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to die from infection, kidney disease and, maybe, breast cancer. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Smoking's Death Toll May Be Higher Than Anyone Knew

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/385498822/385646999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An employee in a Sydney bookshop in 2012 adjusts packaged cigarettes, which have to be sold in identical olive-brown packets bearing the same typeface and largely covered with graphic health warnings. William West/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
William West/AFP/Getty Images