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This notice on a cigarette packet in Thailand shows the potential impact of reduced blood circulation to extremities because of smoking. Such pictorial warnings are among the anti-smoking measures that are more likely to be found in countries that have limited Big Tobacco's influence on their politics, according to the new Global Tobacco Industry Interference Index. Apichart Weerawong/AP hide caption

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Apichart Weerawong/AP

A woman rolls tobacco inside a tendu leaf to make a beedi cigarette at her home in Kannauj, Uttar Pradesh, India, on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. India's smokers favor cheaper options such as chewing and leaf-wrapped tobacco over cigarettes. Udit Kulshrestha/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Udit Kulshrestha/Bloomberg/Getty Images

India Banned E-Cigarettes — But Beedis And Chewing Tobacco Remain Widespread

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President Trump speaks to the press with first lady Melania Trump and Acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Norman Sharpless (left) and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in the Oval Office at the White House on Wednesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

FDA To Banish Flavored E-Cigarettes To Combat Youth Vaping

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Vaping has been linked to a cluster of hospitalizations in Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota. sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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sestovic/Getty Images

What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?

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FDA warns that smoking cigarettes causes Type 2 diabetes, which raises blood sugar, among other serious health risks. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The disclosure of millions of once-secret tobacco industry documents — which are now readily searchable online — has opened a window into Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's interactions with tobacco executives and lobbyists. Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR hide caption

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Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR

Tobacco's 'Special Friend': What Internal Documents Say About Mitch McConnell

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he was spurred to act because of an "unprecedented spike" in the number of teenagers who were vaping, or smoking e-cigarettes. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Signs in a Chicago shop window advertise e-cigarettes and pods from Juul in September. Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris, announced Thursday it would buy a 35 percent stake in the company. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Morning dew glistens on a tobacco leaf in a field outside Rolesville, N.C. Despite a worldwide decline in production, tobacco remains North Carolina's most valuable crop. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'

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Brenda Fitzgerald, Georgia Department of Public Health commissioner, and Gov. Nathan Deal respond to questions about Ebola victims at Emory University Hospital and efforts to screen for Ebola in 2014. A report in Politico revealed documents showing several new investments, including in a tobacco company, by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Brenda Fitzgerald. David Tulis/AP hide caption

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David Tulis/AP

Vapor from e-cigarettes contains toxins, although fewer than conventional cigarettes. mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

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A JUUL e-cigarette for sale at Fast Eddie's Smoke Shop in Boston. The sleek devices are easy to conceal, which makes them popular with teenagers. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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Researchers have found marijuana metabolites in the urine of babies who were exposed to adult marijuana use. deux/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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deux/Corbis/Getty Images

Doctors Say Parents Shouldn't Smoke Pot Around Kids

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