Philippines Philippines

Anti-divorce protesters marched in Manila in February. The Philippine House of Representatives passed a bill in March that would legalize divorce. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Divorce Is Prohibited In The Philippines, But Moves Are Underway To Legalize It

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Jude Sabio displays the communication he submitted to the International Criminal Court. He says he felt it was his duty to bring President Duterte's war on drugs to the attention of prosecutors. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine Lawyer Faces Death Threats After Filing Case At The Hague Against Duterte

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Renato Villa, the Philippine ambassador to Kuwait, speaks during a press conference at the embassy in Kuwait City last week. Yasser al-Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tourists walk along a beach in Malay town, on the Philippine island Boracay, last week. President Duterte's decision to close Boracay has rocked the island. The Philippines is set to deploy hundreds of riot police to keep travelers out and head off potential protests before its six-month closure to tourists. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Philippines Shuts Down A Popular Tourist Island, Residents Fear For Their Future

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Jeepneys, often known in the Philippines as "King of the Road," join traffic on a busy street in Manila last May. Authorities are moving to phase them out, citing pollution and safety concerns. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Push To Modernize Philippine Transport Threatens The Beloved Jeepney

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Lava cascades down the slopes of Mount Mayon on Tuesday as it erupts for a second day, seen from Legazpi city, Philippines. Thousands of villagers were evacuated amid warnings that a violent eruption could be imminent. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

A kamayan is a communal-style Filipino feast, composed of colorful arrays of food that are usually served on banana leaves and eaten without utensils. Bettina Makalintal for NPR hide caption

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Bettina Makalintal for NPR

College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Military trucks drive past destroyed buildings and a mosque in what had been the center of fighting in Marawi on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao on Oct. 25, days after the military declared that the battle against ISIS-linked militants was over. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A girl is vaccinated against dengue as part of a public immunization program for children in the Philippines. The program was suspended after the company raised safety concerns about the vaccination. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte looks on during the 20th ASEAN China Summit in Manila, Philippines, on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. Ezra Acayan/AP hide caption

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The Deadly Cost Of Duterte's War On Drugs

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President Trump shakes hand with Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte during the gala dinner marking ASEAN's 50th anniversary in Manila, Philippines, on Sunday. Athit Perawongmetha/AP hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte meets Defense Secretary Jim Mattis Oct. 24 at the 11th Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Defense Ministers' Meeting at the former Clark Air Base outside Manila. Dondi Tawatao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Mattis Trip To Philippines, Reminders Of Waning U.S. Influence In Region

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Manila Archbishop Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle arrives at the Synod Hall on Oct. 8, 2014, in Vatican City, Vatican. Tagle has called for an end to the bloody war on drugs in the Philippines. Franco Origlia/Getty Images hide caption

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Relatives of an alleged drug dealer killed during a police anti-drug operation react upon seeing his body in Manila on Thursday. Police in the Philippine capital shot dead more than two dozen drug suspects in another round of anti-drug raids, authorities said, as they followed President Rodrigo Duterte's call for dozens of deaths a day. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gives a speech during Eid al-Fitr celebrations marking the end of Ramadan at the Malacanang Palace in Manila on June 27. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man looks on during government airstrikes in the early morning Friday in Marawi. Residents had a brief respite from the fighting Sunday, but gunfire quickly returned to the city after a cease-fire was lifted. Linus G. Escandor ll/AP hide caption

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Philippine Sen. Leila de Lima, a former human rights commissioner and one of President Rodrigo Duterte's most vocal opponents, waves to supporters after appearing at a court in suburban Manila on Feb. 24. She was arrested on drug-related charges that she denies. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Jailed Philippine Senator: 'I Won't Be Silenced Or Cowed'

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