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Despite Official Threats, Toxic Social Media, Journalist Sees 'A Battle We Can Win'

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American troops seized three Philippine church bells as war trophies over a century ago. Now the bells of Balangiga have returned. Ella Mage/NPR hide caption

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Ella Mage/NPR

U.S. Returns Balangiga Church Bells To The Philippines After More Than A Century

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American priest Kenneth Hendricks is accused of abusing at least 10 young boys in the Philippines; U.S. officials who sought his arrest are now trying to learn if there are any victims in Ohio, where he was previously based. Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP hide caption

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Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP

A vocal critic of the government of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, Maria Ressa declared her innocence after turning herself in to answer tax evasion charges. She posted bail at the court in Manila on Monday. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP

Supporters of Kian delos Santos protest on Thursday outside the police station where three policemen involved in Kian's killing were assigned in Manila. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) shakes hands with Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte after a guest book signing at the Malacañang presidential palace in Manila on Tuesday. Duterte called Xi's visit to longtime U.S. ally the Philippines a "milestone." Mark R. Cristino/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark R. Cristino/AFP/Getty Images

Volunteer rescuers head home after working to dig out victims of a landslide triggered by heavy rains from Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippine's Benguet province on Monday. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

A man wades through flooded streets during a No. 10 Hurricane Signal raised for Typhoon Mangkhut in Hong Kong on Sunday. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Anti-divorce protesters marched in Manila in February. The Philippine House of Representatives passed a bill in March that would legalize divorce. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Divorce Is Prohibited In The Philippines, But Moves Are Underway To Legalize It

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Jude Sabio displays the communication he submitted to the International Criminal Court. He says he felt it was his duty to bring President Duterte's war on drugs to the attention of prosecutors. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine Lawyer Faces Death Threats After Filing Case At The Hague Against Duterte

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Renato Villa, the Philippine ambassador to Kuwait, speaks during a press conference at the embassy in Kuwait City last week. Yasser al-Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasser al-Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images

Tourists walk along a beach in Malay town, on the Philippine island Boracay, last week. President Duterte's decision to close Boracay has rocked the island. The Philippines is set to deploy hundreds of riot police to keep travelers out and head off potential protests before its six-month closure to tourists. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

As Philippines Shuts Down A Popular Tourist Island, Residents Fear For Their Future

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Jeepneys, often known in the Philippines as "King of the Road," join traffic on a busy street in Manila last May. Authorities are moving to phase them out, citing pollution and safety concerns. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A Push To Modernize Philippine Transport Threatens The Beloved Jeepney

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Lava cascades down the slopes of Mount Mayon on Tuesday as it erupts for a second day, seen from Legazpi city, Philippines. Thousands of villagers were evacuated amid warnings that a violent eruption could be imminent. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

A kamayan is a communal-style Filipino feast, composed of colorful arrays of food that are usually served on banana leaves and eaten without utensils. Bettina Makalintal for NPR hide caption

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Bettina Makalintal for NPR

College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Military trucks drive past destroyed buildings and a mosque in what had been the center of fighting in Marawi on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao on Oct. 25, days after the military declared that the battle against ISIS-linked militants was over. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

A girl is vaccinated against dengue as part of a public immunization program for children in the Philippines. The program was suspended after the company raised safety concerns about the vaccination. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte looks on during the 20th ASEAN China Summit in Manila, Philippines, on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. Ezra Acayan/AP hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/AP

The Deadly Cost Of Duterte's War On Drugs

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