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Cheese sculptor Sarah Kaufmann poses with her masterpiece, depicting "Great Dairy Moo-ments in Cheese History" on display at this year's Indiana State Fair. It weighs in at almost half a ton. Courtesy of Allison Pareis hide caption

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Courtesy of Allison Pareis

'You Never Know Where Cheese Takes You': Dairy Sculptor Savors The Moo-ments

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Abner Stolztfus owns Cedar Dream dairy farm in Peach Bottom, Pa. Last year, Stolztfus decided to invest almost $200,000 in equipment and learned how to make yogurt from scratch. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Kentucky bourbon could be the target of new tariffs from European allies if President Trump approves restrictions on steel and aluminum imports. Luke Sharrett/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Getty Images

Kentucky Bourbon, Wisconsin Cheese Could Be Targets In Trade War

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A block of Tomme de Savoie cheese ages with a sweater of Mucor lanceolatus fungal mold. Mucor itself doesn't have a strong taste, but more flavorful bacteria can travel far and wide along its hyphae — the microscopic, branched tendrils that fungi use to bring in nutrients. Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe

Ten international cheesemongers competed to be named the best cheesemonger in the world at Mondial du Fromage. Nathalie Vanhaver, from Belgium, in center, took gold. Christophe Gonzalez, from France, on the left, won silver; and for the first time ever, an American, Nadjeeb Chouaf, took home the bronze. Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee hide caption

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Courtesy of Rodolphe Le Meunier/Deedee Dorzee

A depiction of Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that create a deadly toxin. The preformed toxin can be found in home-canned foods and some retail products, such as canned cheese, chili sauces and oil infused with garlic. Jennifer Oosthuizen/CDC hide caption

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Jennifer Oosthuizen/CDC

On Tuesday, William Wangerin (front) and three other judges consider cheeses at the U.S. Championship Cheese Contest in Green Bay, Wis. The contest organizer, Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association, says the number of cheeses, yogurts and butters competing at this year's event is at an all-time high. Carrie Antlfinger/AP hide caption

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Carrie Antlfinger/AP

A Palestinian Bedouin girl milks a sheep in her family's makeshift camp in the West Bank. Herders live close to their animals, their main source of income. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

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True cheddar cheese can take months — even years — to age. So Claudia Lucero created a faux-cheddar that can be made in very little time. fotolia hide caption

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fotolia

How To Make A Faux Cheddar In One Hour

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Many artisan cheese producers never pasteurize their milk – it's raw. The milk's natural microbial community is still in there. This microbial festival gives cheese variety and intrigues scientists. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Ancient Art Of Cheese-Making Attracts Scientific Gawkers

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A French cheesemaker sets up wheels of Reblochon, a semi-soft cheese made from raw cow's milk, for maturing in a farm in the French Alps. Anglophone cheesemakers say translating a French government cheese manual will help them make safer raw milk cheese. Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Pierre Clatot/AFP/Getty Images

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif. Tim Hussin for NPR hide caption

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Tim Hussin for NPR

Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips

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Eating some foods high in saturated fat is not necessarily going to increase your risk of heart disease, a study shows, contrary to the dietary science of the past 40 years. Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto hide caption

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Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto