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Aid Will Move Slowly From Yemen Port Cease-Fire — If It Lasts

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The State Of U.S.-Saudi Relations, After The Senate's Rebuke

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., sponsored the resolution to withdraw U.S. military aid from the war in Yemen with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah. He argues the move will garner international notice as the conflict continues. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Senate Votes To End U.S. Support For War In Yemen, Rebuking Trump And Saudi Arabia

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Representatives of the Houthi rebel delegation (left) and the Yemeni government's delegation (right) pose for a picture with representatives from the office of the U.N. Special Envoy for Yemen and the International Committee of the Red Cross on Tuesday, during peace talks at Johannesberg Castle in Rimbo, Sweden. Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images

Swedish and U.N. officials, as well as delegates of Yemen's government and the Houthi rebels, attend the opening press conference of the Yemeni peace talks at Johannesberg castle in Rimbo, Sweden, on Thursday. Stina Stjernkvist/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stina Stjernkvist/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said he doesn't doubt that Saudi Arabia's crown prince is culpable for the death of a Washington Post writer in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sara, a 10-year-old at al Thawra hospital in Hodeidah, Yemen, is half paralyzed by diphtheria, an illness that can be prevented by vaccination. She subsequently had to leave the hospital because of the violence. UNICEF/Touma/Yemen/2018 hide caption

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UNICEF/Touma/Yemen/2018

Why A 'War On Children' In Yemen Could Get Worse

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A friend attends to the body of a Yemeni fighter on Sept. 22. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

Plagued By War and Famine, Yemen Is 'No Longer A Functioning State,' Journalist Warns

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A Yemeni man walks through the rubble of a building after a Saudi-led coalition airstrike last month in the capital, Sanaa. "The time is now for the cessation of hostilities," U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

Displaced Yemeni children stare through a hole in the wall of a half-destroyed house in Taez, where they have been staying with several families since violence drove them from their homes in Hodeidah earlier this year. Ahmad al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images

In the air campaign by Saudi Arabia and its allies against Yemen's Shiite rebels, rights experts say there has been a pattern by the Saudi-led coalition of failing to distinguish between civilian and military targets and disregarding the likelihood of civilian casualties. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

A Yemeni woman and a girl, displaced from the coastal city of Hodeidah, sit at a shelter in Sanaa, Yemen, on Aug. 17. Thursday's airstrike took place near Hodeidah. picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Images

Nageeb Alomari, an American citizen, was attempting to bring his family to the U.S. from war-torn Yemen when the Trump administration instituted its now successfully-upheld travel ban, which included his home country. Wesaam Al-Badry for NPR hide caption

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Wesaam Al-Badry for NPR

A Yemeni-American Wanted To Bring His Family Home. Then Came The Travel Ban.

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A man carries a wounded child to the hospital Thursday after the Saudi-led coalition carried out an airstrike on a crowded area in Houthi-controlled Saada province. At least 29 children under the age of 15 were killed in the attack, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Folders full of immigration paperwork line the shelves of Faisal Alhashadi's office in New York City. An immigration specialist who works in the Bronx, Alhashadi has been advocating on behalf of Yemeni nationals visiting and living in the U.S. Melissa Bunni Elian for NPR hide caption

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Melissa Bunni Elian for NPR

Protesters in Seoul demonstrate against a group of asylum seekers from Yemen, on June 30. Hundreds of asylum seekers from Yemen have arrived in South Korea's southern resort island of Jeju. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Anti-Refugee Backlash In South Korea Targets Yemenis Fleeing War And Seeking Asylum

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A column of Yemeni pro-government forces, travels Wednesday about five miles south of Hodeidah international airport. Backed by the Saudi-led coalition, the fighters launched an offensive to retake the rebel-held Red Sea port city. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Yemeni fighters loyal to the government carry explosives and land mines believed to have been planted by Houthis on June 8 near Hudaydah. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images