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Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line during a prison tour at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. A Department of Justice report finds violence in Alabama's overcrowded prisons is 'cruel' and 'pervasive.' Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Justice Dept. Finds Violence In Alabama Prisons 'Common, Cruel, Pervasive'

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A family photo of Bettye, Miriam and Edwin Pratt together in 1966. Courtesy of Jean Soliz hide caption

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Courtesy of Jean Soliz

Her Dad Was A Slain Civil Rights Leader. She Remembers His Assassination

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President John F. Kennedy and members of the Civil Rights Commission pose during a White House conference in Washington in 1961. Wofford is seated to Kennedy's left. Byron Rollins/AP hide caption

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Byron Rollins/AP

Harris Wofford, Former Senator, Civil Rights Activist, Dies At 92

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In August 1963, African-American girls were held in a Georgia stockade after being arrested for demonstrating segregation. Left to right: Melinda Jones Williams (13), Laura Ruff Saunders (13), Mattie Crittenden Reese, Pearl Brown, Carol Barner Seay (12), Annie Ragin Laster (14), Willie Smith Davis (15), Shirley Green (14), and Billie Jo Thornton Allen (13). Sitting on the floor: Verna Hollis (15). Danny Lyon hide caption

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Danny Lyon

'I Gave Up Hope': As Girls, They Were Jailed In Squalor For Protesting Segregation

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A decision barring dual prosecutions could allow some of those already convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's probe to get off scot-free if President Trump were to pardon them. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

This Supreme Court Case Could Impact The Mueller Probe And Boost Trump's Pardon Power

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Georgia voters at an Atlanta high school on Nov. 6, 2018. Voting issues became a central issue in the hotly contested governor's race between Republican Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

People wait in line to vote at a polling place on the first day of early voting on Oct. 22 in Houston. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has been aggressively prosecuting people for voting violations, which critics argue is designed to intimidate non-white voters. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

Dorothy Cotton, pictured at a press conference at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., was the educational director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the civil rights era. She has died at 88. Dorothy Cotton Institute hide caption

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Dorothy Cotton Institute

From left Bishop James Shannon, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Dr. Martin Luther King and Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, February 6, 1968. Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images

Rev. William Barber is co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival. He says this movement is about bringing issues of poverty into the national political discourse. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

The Poor People's Campaign Seeks To Complete Martin Luther King's Final Dream

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An Axon body camera worn by an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Body Camera Maker Weighs Adding Facial Recognition Technology

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The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opening in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday, is dedicated to victims of lynching. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

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Coretta Scott King, center, accompanied by the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, her children, and singer Harry Belafonte, leads a march in Memphis to honor her husband who was assassinated four days earlier. AP hide caption

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AP

After MLK's Death, Coretta Scott King Went To Memphis To Finish His Work

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Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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Critics of Roger Severino, director of the Office for Civil Rights at HHS, worry Severino's efforts on behalf of some health workers will reduce women's access to reproductive health services and could aggravate discrimination against transgender people. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Civil Rights Chief At HHS Defends The Right To Refuse Care On Religious Grounds

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Former Democratic Sen. Fred Harris of Oklahoma, seen in August 2017, holds a copy of The Kerner Report, as he discusses its 50th anniversary. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Russell Contreras/AP

Report Updates Landmark 1968 Racism Study, Finds More Poverty And Segregation

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Cleveland Sellers, center, stands with officers after his arrest in Orangeburg, S.C., where three were killed and others wounded during a demonstration on Feb. 9, 1968. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years After The Orangeburg Massacre, Looking For Justice In South Carolina

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