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civil rights

People wait in line to vote at a polling place on the first day of early voting on Oct. 22 in Houston. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has been aggressively prosecuting people for voting violations, which critics argue is designed to intimidate non-white voters. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

Dorothy Cotton, pictured at a press conference at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., was the educational director for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the civil rights era. She has died at 88. Dorothy Cotton Institute hide caption

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Dorothy Cotton Institute

From left Bishop James Shannon, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Dr. Martin Luther King and Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Cemetery, February 6, 1968. Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Del Vecchio/Washington Post/Getty Images

Rev. William Barber is co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival. He says this movement is about bringing issues of poverty into the national political discourse. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

The Poor People's Campaign Seeks To Complete Martin Luther King's Final Dream

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An Axon body camera worn by an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Body Camera Maker Weighs Adding Facial Recognition Technology

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The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opening in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday, is dedicated to victims of lynching. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

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Coretta Scott King, center, accompanied by the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, her children, and singer Harry Belafonte, leads a march in Memphis to honor her husband who was assassinated four days earlier. AP hide caption

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AP

After MLK's Death, Coretta Scott King Went To Memphis To Finish His Work

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Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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Critics of Roger Severino, director of the Office for Civil Rights at HHS, worry Severino's efforts on behalf of some health workers will reduce women's access to reproductive health services and could aggravate discrimination against transgender people. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Civil Rights Chief At HHS Defends The Right To Refuse Care On Religious Grounds

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Former Democratic Sen. Fred Harris of Oklahoma, seen in August 2017, holds a copy of The Kerner Report, as he discusses its 50th anniversary. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Russell Contreras/AP

Report Updates Landmark 1968 Racism Study, Finds More Poverty And Segregation

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Cleveland Sellers, center, stands with officers after his arrest in Orangeburg, S.C., where three were killed and others wounded during a demonstration on Feb. 9, 1968. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years After The Orangeburg Massacre, Looking For Justice In South Carolina

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Madison Jensen, 21, died on Dec. 1, 2016, of a cardiac arrhythmia due to dehydration and opiate withdrawal while in custody of the Duchesne County, Utah, jail. Courtesy of Jared Jensen hide caption

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Courtesy of Jared Jensen

Tennessee National Guard troopers in jeeps and trucks escort a protest march by striking sanitation workers through downtown Memphis, March 30, 1968. LG/AP hide caption

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LG/AP

Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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AP

Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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Dion Diamond listens with his eyes closed to George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, at a "whites-only" lunch counter in Arlington, Va., in 1960. DC Public Library, Star Collection, Washington Post hide caption

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DC Public Library, Star Collection, Washington Post

The Civil Rights Activist Whose Name You've Probably Never Heard

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President Trump gets a tour of the newly-opened Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., on Saturday. He was joined by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Mary Hamilton, seen here with James Farmer of CORE, was a civil rights organizer who fought for the right to be addressed as "Miss" in an Alabama court and won. Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images

When 'Miss' Meant So Much More: How One Woman Fought Alabama — And Won

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