civil rights civil rights

President Trump gets a tour of the newly-opened Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, Miss., on Saturday. He was joined by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Mary Hamilton, seen here with James Farmer of CORE, was a civil rights organizer who fought for the right to be addressed as "Miss" in an Alabama court and won. Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images

When 'Miss' Meant So Much More: How One Woman Fought Alabama — And Won

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Students Drive New Policies As K-12 Sexual Assault Investigations Rise

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Attendees stand behind a sign with the NAACP's logo at a 2015 rally in Washington, D.C. The civil rights group is holding its annual convention in Baltimore this year. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
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Say Goodbye To X+Y: Should Community Colleges Abolish Algebra?

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Members of the South Asian community and others attend a peace vigil for Srinivas Kuchibhotla, the 32-year-old Indian engineer killed at a bar Olathe, Kansas, in Bellevue, Washington on March 5, 2017. Jason Redmond/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Indian Americans Reckon With Reality Of Hate Crimes

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Martin Luther King, Jr. listening to a transistor radio in the front line of the third march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to campaign for proper registration of black voters, March 23, 1965. Ralph Abernathy (second from left), Ralph Bunche (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (far right) march with him. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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UCLA students hold crosses, while taking part in a 2006 rally on campus to express their concerns about the lack of racial diversity in the student body. Mel Melcon/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mel Melcon/LA Times via Getty Images