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Some Black Americans Turn To Informal Economy In The Face Of Discrimination

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Speaking to a crowd in Huntington, W.Va., on Thursday, President Trump said the U.S. economy is on its way back. Justin Merriman/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Merriman/Getty Images

Now That He's President, Trump Is Sounding More Positive About The Economy

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Part of the gains in the U.S. job market last month came in health care, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. Here, a nurse screens a patient in Emporia, Va. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Job seekers chat during an employment event in Dallas last month. Under the new administration, Republicans are starting to see the economy through rose-colored glasses. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Is The Economic Glass Half-Full Or Half-Empty? It Depends

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Volunteers serve free dinner to homeless people at Robin Hood restaurant in Madrid. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Spain's 'Robin Hood Restaurant' Charges The Rich And Feeds The Poor

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An employee moves cement blocks at the Cement Products Manufacturing Co. facility in Redmond, Ore. Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the labor force since the 1960s. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Economic Mystery: Why Are Men Leaving The Workforce?

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Job seekers fill out applications inside the employment center at the Six Flags Entertainment Corp. Great Adventure amusement park in Jackson, N.J., in March. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A cashier counts money at a Toys "R" Us in Los Angeles last November. A pinch in earnings and hours disappointed those looking for a pickup in paychecks last month. Liz O. Baylen/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Liz O. Baylen/LA Times via Getty Images

A customer pays for goods while shopping at the Atlanta Farmers Market in Atlanta. Average hourly earnings fell by 3 cents last month, according to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics report. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

People attend a job fair in October, 2015, at Dolphin Mall in Miami. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Unemployment May Be Dropping, But It's Still Twice As High For Blacks

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Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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Nigerian billionaire Tony Elumelu hopes to create job opportunities by investing in African startups. Above: Elumelu, center right, speaks at an entrepreneurship event in July 2015. Courtesy of Tony Elumelu Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of Tony Elumelu Foundation

To End Poverty, Billionaire Gives $10,000 To 10,000 Entrepreneurs

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Ricardo Robleño Llorente and his wife, Laura Silva Kirkpatrick, show their college degrees at home in Madrid. Even though they have two bachelor's degrees and a master's between them, they were unable to find permanent work through most of their 20s, during Spain's economic crisis. "Why bother going to college at all?" Silva Kirkpatrick asks. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Spain's Economy Is Expanding, But Most New Jobs Are Temporary

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