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Ashtabula, Ohio, was a thriving factory town in the 1950s, with a busy port where freighters brought iron ore to be used in the steel mills of Pennsylvania. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Jim Zarroli/NPR

For One Ohio Town, Trump's Trade Policies Bring Uncertainty And Hope

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Sara Murawski, pictured on the patio of her new condo in Portland, Ore., has been dreaming of homeownership for two decades. This year, she became a first-time homebuyer — seeing first hand how Portland's red-hot housing market is starting to cool and become a little friendlier to buyers. Courtesy of Justin Dias hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Dias

New Homebuyers Face A Friendlier Housing Market, Thanks To Cooldown

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Katiena Johnson stands with her daughter Destini, who was released from jail in August. Katiena and her husband, Roger, took care of their grandchildren while Destini was struggling through her addiction. Destini, 27, recently regained consciousness after suffering a dozen or so strokes as a result of her latest opioid overdose. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Anguished Families Shoulder The Biggest Burdens Of Opioid Addiction

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Highline writer Michael Hobbes says millennials have inherited a number of financial problems from baby boomers. monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images/iStockphoto

'Entitled' Millennials Have It Harder Than The Previous Generation, Writer Says

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Protesters rally outside a restaurant in St. Louis on Feb. 13. The service industry employs the largest percentage of minimum wage workers. Jeff Curry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Curry/Getty Images

Job seekers line up to enter a career fair in Los Angeles, on Dec. 1, 2010. At the peak of the recession, the unemployment rate hit 10 percent. It's now 4.1 percent. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

People eat at a noodle stall at the Han Market in the central Vietnamese city of Danang in November. Vietnamese respondents to the Pew Research Center survey overwhelmingly said life is better than it was 50 years ago. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump greets supporters Wednesday in St. Charles, Mo., before his speech on taxes. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

FACT CHECK: President Trump's Tax Speech In Missouri

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The damage to Houston's economy from Harvey's torrential rainfall will be by one estimate more than $30 billion, a staggering sum. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Economic Impact Of Harvey Could Be Felt Nationwide Before It's Over

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Speaking to a crowd in Huntington, W.Va., on Thursday, President Trump said the U.S. economy is on its way back. Justin Merriman/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Merriman/Getty Images

Now That He's President, Trump Is Sounding More Positive About The Economy

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