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A border protection officer stands next to a recently upgraded section of fencing at the U.S.-Mexico border in Calexico, Calif., on Friday. The Pentagon says it will send 5,000 U.S. troops to the border. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The single dog tag in the 55 boxes of human remains turned over to the U.S. by North Korea last week was still readable. It was presented to Master Sgt. Charles Hobert McDaniel's two sons at a ceremony on Wednesday. Jay Price /Member station WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price /Member station WUNC

Lt. Gen. Austin S. "Scott" Miller, shown here in 2015, a 57-year-old West Point graduate, has spent much of his career with Special Operators, working in the shadows on battlefields that include Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan. He most recently was commander of the Joint Special Operations Command, which includes Delta Force and SEAL Team 6. Sgt. 1st Class Michael Noggle/U.S. Army hide caption

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Sgt. 1st Class Michael Noggle/U.S. Army

Immigration lawyer Margaret Stock displays a document sent to U.S. Army enlistee Shu Luo, threatening him with deportation. Courtesy of Margaret Stock hide caption

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Courtesy of Margaret Stock

ICE Drops Deportation Threat Against Chinese Student Joining U.S. Army

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U.S. soldiers with actors portraying Afghan officials as part of their training to be advisers. Jay Price/WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/WUNC

Soldiers, With Empathy: U.S. Army Creates Dedicated Adviser Brigades

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These photographs, taken at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., show the forearms of several test subjects after they were exposed to nitrogen mustard and lewisite agents during World War II experiments conducted at the lab. Naval Research Laboratory hide caption

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Naval Research Laboratory

Images provided by the U.S. Army of soldiers killed in Niger show, from left, Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Wash.; Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; Sgt. La David Johnson of Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga. AP hide caption

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AP

Lineman and Electricians train with the APA-5 Atlas Powered Ascender to recover rescue dummy prior to the onset of suspension trauma. Courtesy of Nate Ball/Atlas Devices hide caption

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Courtesy of Nate Ball/Atlas Devices

The Army, The Inventor And The Surprising Uses Of A Batman Machine

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The Pentagon is seeking millions of dollars from nearly 10,000 current or former soldiers in the California National Guard, saying they weren't eligible for re-enlistment bonuses. Here, soldiers from the state's guard force are seen in 2010, resting during transport in northeastern Afghanistan. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Soldiers walk past a military police officer (right) patrolling the perimeter of the U.S. Army IMCOM HQ building at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, prior to the Article 32 preliminary hearing to determine whether Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will be court-martialed. Darren Abate/AP hide caption

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Darren Abate/AP

This July 1943 photo provided by the Los Angeles Chapter, Tuskegee Airmen Inc., shows Lowell C. Steward after his graduation from flight training at Tuskegee Army Air Field, in Tuskegee, Ala. Steward, who won the Distinguished Flying Cross among other awards, died on Wednesday at age 95. AP hide caption

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AP

Daisy Armstrong began performing poetry when her mother took her to a youth poetry group. Soon, she was winning competitions — but she was also kicked out of school after a slam poetry tour. Daniel Schaefer/Courtesy of OutlierImagery.com hide caption

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Daniel Schaefer/Courtesy of OutlierImagery.com

From Feeling Lost To Army Strong, With The Help Of Poetry

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Members of the American Widow Project cheer at the end of an annual event in San Diego. The organization's mission is to help heal and empower participants. Courtesy of Erin Dructor hide caption

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Courtesy of Erin Dructor

Moving On: Project Helps War Widows Recover

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Mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles — MRAPs — like these are some of the more than $7 billion in equipment the U.S. Army is dismantling and selling as scrap in Afghanistan. Lucas Jackson/AP hide caption

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Lucas Jackson/AP