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Boeing said on Sunday that it was aware of problems with a key safety indicator in 2017, but it didn't inform airlines or the FAA until after the Lion Air crash a year later. Here, 737 Max jets built for American Airlines (left) and Air Canada are parked at the airport adjacent to a Boeing production facility in Renton, Wash., in April. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

A Boeing employee works on the fuselage of a 737 Max 9 test plane at the company's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Orders for durable goods jumped 2.7% last month, fueled in part by strong demand for commercial aircraft. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan was cleared by the Pentagon's Inspector General of allegations of ethics violations. Shanahan is seen here testifying at a House Armed Services Committee hearing last month. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft are parked on the tarmac after being grounded, at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, Calif., on March 28. Boeing said its financial outlook is uncertain as it deals with the 737 Max grounding. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

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A new Airbus A320neo aircraft is presented by the Spanish airline Vueling at Barcelona's airport on Sept. 27, 2018. The Trump administration is preparing to slap tariffs on imports from Europe, citing subsidies of Airbus jets. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line on March 27, in Renton, Wash. Boeing is slowing production of its grounded Max airliner while it works on fixing flight-control software in the wake of fatal crashes. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 sits grounded in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in March. Ethiopian officials on Thursday released the initial report into last month's crash of a Max 8. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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On the day of the Lion Air crash, Verian Utama (left) was traveling on the flight with a former pro rider named Andrea Manfredi (right), a friend who also perished. Courtesy of Verian Utama's family hide caption

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Courtesy of Verian Utama's family

For Family Of A Lion Air Crash Victim, 'The Happiness Is Gone'

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Federal Aviation Administration Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell (left), National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt, and Department of Transportation Inspector General Calvin Scovel, appear before a Senate Transportation subcommittee on commercial airline safety on Wednesday to discuss two recent Boeing 737 Max crashes. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

FAA Head Defends Agency Actions Following Recent Air Disasters

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Boeing 737 Max jets are grounded at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix on March 14. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Boeing Brings 100 Years Of History To Its Fight To Restore Its Reputation

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President Trump plans to nominate Stephen Dickson to lead the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency is under scrutiny for its response to two crashes of Boeing 737 airplanes, which are pictured here outside Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

A Norwegian Air Boeing 737 Max 8 is parked on the tarmac at Helsinki Airport on Wednesday after the airplane model was grounded in most of the world. Lehtikuva/Heikki Saukkomaa/Reuters hide caption

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Lehtikuva/Heikki Saukkomaa/Reuters

For Boeing, Costs Of Grounding Jets Have Only Just Begun

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Responders at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash. Countries around the world have grounded their Boeing 737 Max jets and there is growing political pressure on the Federal Aviation Administration to do the same. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

A Boeing 737 Max 8 airliner lands at Boeing Field to complete its first flight on Jan. 29, 2016, in Seattle. The Boeing 737 Max is the fastest-selling plane in the company's history. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Debris from an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 jet sits in a field near Bishoftu, where the plane crashed after taking off from Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images

FAA To Order Changes In Boeing 737 Max Jets After Ethiopian Airlines Crash

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