Fish Fish

Using dipnets --€” which have nets up to 5 feet in diameter at the end --€” isn't easy, and the river can get pretty crowded. Robert Carter, a novice dipnetter, holds up the first fish he caught after a day on the Kenai River. Annie Feidt/Alaska Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Feidt/Alaska Public Media

Forget The Fishing Boat: Alaskans Scoop Up Salmon With Dipnets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/335192763/335540231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yellowfin tuna; Chinook salmon; lingcod; Pacific halibut. Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr

The FDA is recommending that pregnant women eat 8 to 12 ounces per week of fish such as salmon, canned light tuna, tilapia or cod. Iakov Filimonov/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Iakov Filimonov/iStockphoto.com

Carp are collected at a breeding farm near the Belarus village of Ozerny in November 2013. Researchers say there's a lot the aquaculture industry can do to be more efficient. Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.") Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

A marlin caught as bycatch by the California drift gillnet fishery. The conservation group Oceana called the fishery one of the "dirtiest" in the U.S. because of its high rate of discarded fish and other marine animals. Courtesy of NOAA hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of NOAA

A fish that knows the way to go: the Chinook salmon, which appears to use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate ocean waters and rivers. Jeff T. Green/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff T. Green/Getty Images

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line. Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar hide caption

toggle caption
Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar

Ava Gene's, a Roman-inspired restaurant in Portland, Ore., incorporates colatura, a modern descendant of ancient Roman fish sauce, into several of its dishes. Deena Prichep/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deena Prichep/NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/240237774/240955358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People hoist the body of an 18-foot oarfish that was discovered in Toyon Bay at Catalina Island off the California coast. Courtesty of Catalina Island Marine Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesty of Catalina Island Marine Institute

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

In a study of 4,000 pregnant women, fish accounted for only 7 percent of blood mercury levels. JackF/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
JackF/iStockphoto.com