Fish Fish

Yellowtail jack (Seriola lalandi) at HSWRI in San Diego. Courtesy of HSWRI hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of HSWRI

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436414230/436673778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kumu (sp. Parupeneus porphyreus). The Whitesaddle Goatfish has a special place in Hawaiian culture. In ancient Hawaii, the fish were used in offerings to the gods. Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada

Lake herring roe at the Dockside Fish Market in Grand Marais, Minn. Some workers at the market call it "Lake Superior Gold." Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Montgomery for NPR

Europe's Taste For Caviar Is Putting Pressure On A Great Lakes Fish

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/427153759/427464728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod. Courtesy of Chris Tremblay hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413672058/414689883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Parisi Tsakirios, 29, mends a net as he prepares for another fishing trip. "I can't imagine doing any other job, because I love the sea," he says. "But there are hardly any fish. I barely break even. I can't support my family." Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

As Fish Stocks Dwindle, So Do The Livelihoods Of Greek Fishermen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413122660/413995729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NOAA Fisheries biologist Nick Wegner holds an opah caught during a research survey off the California coast. Researchers say the opah is the first fish known to be fully warmblooded, circulating heated blood throughout its body. NOAA/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
NOAA/Reuters/Landov

Chef Marcus Samuelsson first fell in love with a version of this burger at a tiny fish shack in Barbados. Paul Brissman /Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Brissman /Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Don't Be Fooled By The Fishy Ingredients: This Burger Is Delicious

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389050800/389321661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sweet or salty? Historically among Eastern European Jews, how they liked their gefilte fish depended on where they lived. This divide created a strictly Jewish geography known as "the gefilte fish line." Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Eggers/NPR

Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus — one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment. A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson/McGill University hide caption

toggle caption
A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson/McGill University

Asian carp, battered and fried. As the fish makes its unwelcome way up the Mississippi River, chefs are trying to get people to eat to beat it back. Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr

Fighting (Tasty) Invasive Fish With Forks And Knives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340648935/341083642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These undated photos provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife show the endangered greenback cutthroat trout and the Colorado River cutthroat trout. Federal and state biologists have stocked the wrong fish for more than two decades. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Using dipnets --€” which have nets up to 5 feet in diameter at the end --€” isn't easy, and the river can get pretty crowded. Robert Carter, a novice dipnetter, holds up the first fish he caught after a day on the Kenai River. Annie Feidt/Alaska Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Feidt/Alaska Public Media

Forget The Fishing Boat: Alaskans Scoop Up Salmon With Dipnets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/335192763/335540231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript