Housing Housing

Christine Thompson lives in Milwaukee with her children ages 7 and 3. They have been served a "Notice to Vacate" by their landlord for not paying rent. In Wisconsin, and most other areas of the country, landlords may evict tenants during any time of the year, including during the winter. Coburn Dukehart for NPR hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart for NPR

As Temperatures Fall, No Halt To Evictions Across Most Of The Country

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Roberto Fret, 54, stands in the backyard of his damaged home. Hurricane Maria blew the roof off the house; the wind was so powerful that it twisted the metal roofing material and scattered pieces of it all over the yard. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Are Still In Shelters. Now What?

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Laura Smith and Gustavo Douaihi were looking to rent a house in Baton Rouge, La., when they encountered discrimination. Andrew Billon hide caption

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Andrew Billon

Looking For A Home When Your Name Is Hispanic And Finding Discrimination Instead

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James Brown, who was homeless for more than 20 years in Los Angeles, in his apartment building in East Hollywood. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

In A Push To House The Homeless, High Prices Are Eroding Gains

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Macaques are social animals, whether in a group enclosure like this one at the Gelsenkircen zoo in western Germany, or in the wild. But many research monkeys are still housed in separate cages. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

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New buildings, a mix of residential and office space, stand on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, which has seen a surge of development in recent years. The long-neglected area includes the Hudson Yards, the largest private real estate development in U.S. history. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After an earthen floor is put down, it is covered with an oil-based floor sealant that hardens and makes it easy to clean. Jacques Nkinzingabo/Courtesy of EarthEnable hide caption

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Jacques Nkinzingabo/Courtesy of EarthEnable

Demonstrators march in Moscow on Sunday against the city's controversial plan to knock down Soviet-era apartment blocks and redevelop the old neighborhoods. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

Muscovites Protest Mayor's Plans to Demolish Their Homes

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In Austin, A Boom In Short-Term Rentals Brings A Backlash

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Joseph Funn experienced homelessness for almost 20 years, until he moved into an apartment in December. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Obamacare Helped The Homeless, Who Now Worry About Coverage Repeal

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A newer home is undergoing renovations at the end of a block of row houses in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Newcomers began arriving in the neighborhood more than a decade ago. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

HUD Secretary Julian Castro hopes his likely successor, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, will come to support many of HUD's programs, but worries whether he'll roll back a new fair housing rule. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

HUD's Castro Worries That Housing Rule Could Be Rolled Back

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Kids play ball on the Wind River Indian Reservation, which is home to members of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. Angie Wagner/AP hide caption

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Angie Wagner/AP

With Little Housing Growth, Native American Families Live In Close Quarters

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A roofer works on a home in Chapel Hill, N.C. A rebound in spending on home remodeling is a good sign for the U.S. economy. But a shortage of skilled workers is restraining activity. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

There's A Home Renovation Boom, But Good Luck Finding A Contractor

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Robert Carter/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Fewer Young People Buying Houses, But Why?

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In Arlington, Va., WeLive developers say that what residents give up in personal square footage is made up for with large communal areas. WeLive hide caption

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WeLive

They're Small, But These Big-City Apartments Tout Their Communal Feel

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William Kitt has lived in a studio apartment in New York owned by the nonprofit Broadway Housing Communities for 13 years, after decades of living on the streets. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Invisibilia: For An Artist, A Room Of His Own Is A Lifesaver

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