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Gina Haspel is sworn in to testify at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee in Washington on May 9. The full Senate on Thursday confirmed Haspel as CIA director, making her the first woman to hold the job. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Gina Haspel (in white), the nominee to lead the CIA, is welcomed at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (seated), and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in Washington on May 9. The committee voted 10-5 on Wednesday to recommend Haspel's confirmation by the full Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Panel Approves Gina Haspel As CIA Chief; Confirmation Appears Likely

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

This 2017 photo shows the man on the right, identified by local Hong Kong media as former CIA agent Jerry Chun Shing Lee, standing in front of a member of security at the unveiling of Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvator Mundi" painting at the Christie's showroom in Hong Kong. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Former CIA director Gen. Michael Hayden delivers remarks on national security at the National Academy of Sciences in October. Hayden is among a growing number of former intelligence officials who are now speaking out regularly in retirement. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

In Retirement, America's Spies Are Getting Downright Chatty

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Since stepping down as CIA chief last year, John Brennan has been a harsh critic of President Trump. "I just think he hasn't fulfilled the responsibilities of the president of the United States," Brennan tells NPR. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Free To Speak, Ex-CIA Chief John Brennan Takes On Trump

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Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

The CIA Introduces Gina Haspel After Her Long Career Undercover

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Secretary of State-designate Mike Pompeo pauses while speaking during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on confirmation last week on Capitol Hill in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

CIA Director Mike Pompeo speaks in Washington in January. The spy agency has become more open and active in recruiting staff, with the aim of greater diversity. Even Pompeo encourages job applications in his public remarks. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

CIA Recruiting: The Rare Topic The Spy Agency Likes To Talk About

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Deputy Director Gina Haspel joined the agency in 1985. President Trump tweeted this month that he would nominate CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the new secretary of state and Haspel to replace him. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

ProPublica has issued a correction and apology for its 2017 article about Gina Haspel, a CIA veteran who is President Trump's pick to head the CIA. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

ProPublica Corrects Its Story On Trump's CIA Nominee Gina Haspel And Waterboarding

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Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. AP via CIA hide caption

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AP via CIA

Mike Pompeo has been a leading critic of the nuclear deal with Iran and has said the U.S. would not soften its stance on North Korea ahead of planned talks between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Mike Pompeo: A Soldier, Spy Chief And Tea Party Republican To Become A Diplomat

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Sergey Naryshkin speaks during the European Social Charter Conference in March 2016 in Turin, Italy, prior to his appointment to head Russia's SVR foreign intelligence service. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

CIA Director Mike Pompeo spoke Tuesday at the American Enterprise Institute about the daily briefing he provides to President Trump most mornings at the White House. He pushed back against reports that Trump is not engaged. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The New York Times says the investigation took place against a backdrop of a major breach of CIA informants in China that began around 2010. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Former National Intelligence Director James Clapper testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing: "Russian Interference in the 2016 United States Election," in May. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP