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A man believed to be Kim Jong Nam is surrounded by journalists upon his arrival at a Beijing airport in February 2007. Japan Pool via Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japan Pool via Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images

After she was detained, CIA officer Marti Peterson was taken to the KGB headquarters, Lubyanka, in central Moscow. She was held for four hours and kicked out of the Soviet Union the next day. She went on to work another 26 years for the CIA. H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum hide caption

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H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum

'Moscow Rules': How The CIA Operated Under The Watchful Eye Of The KGB

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The CIA had a booth at the recent Awesome Con gathering for movie and comic book superheroes in Washington. It's one quirky example of the way the spy agency is reaching out to a broader potential pool of recruits. Greg Myre/NPR hide caption

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Greg Myre/NPR

CIA Recruiting Comes Out Into The Open

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This painting of Virginia Hall hangs in one of the main hallways near the entrance of CIA headquarters. The painting shows her making radio contact with London from an old barn in France to request supplies and personnel. Power for her radio was provided by a bicycle rigged to power an electric generator. Courtesy of CIA hide caption

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Courtesy of CIA

'A Woman Of No Importance' Finally Gets Her Due

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Tony Mendez, the former CIA officer who rescued six American diplomats from revolutionary Iran in 1980, died Saturday. He's shown here in 2012 in Washington, D.C., at the premiere of Argo, a film based on his operation in Iran. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Tony Mendez, The 'Argo' Spy Who Rescued Americans In Iran, Dies At 78

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CIA Director Gina Haspel, speaking at the University of Louisville in September, says she wants to send more undercover officers overseas. Many in the intelligence world says this has become more challenging in an era of universal surveillance. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

CIA Chief Pushes For More Spies Abroad; Surveillance Makes That Harder

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The President's Daily Briefing is the top-secret intelligence report the CIA presents to the president every weekday. The book shown here is for a briefing delivered to President George W. Bush in 2002. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Sept. 11 Revealed The Importance And Limits Of The President's Daily Briefing

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John Brennan is shown speaking here at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda, Calif., in 2016, when he was serving as CIA director. Brennan says he is considering a legal challenge to President Trump's decision to revoke his security clearance. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the former CIA director, and CIA official Andrew Kim, the pair on the left, have dinner with North Korea's Kim Yong Chol, a former intelligence chief, in New York on Wednesday. Current and former spy chiefs are playing an unusually prominent role in arranging a proposed summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. U.S. State Department hide caption

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U.S. State Department

The Spies Have A Leading Role In The North Korea Summit

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Gina Haspel is sworn in to testify at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee in Washington on May 9. The full Senate on Thursday confirmed Haspel as CIA director, making her the first woman to hold the job. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Gina Haspel (in white), the nominee to lead the CIA, is welcomed at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (seated), and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in Washington on May 9. The committee voted 10-5 on Wednesday to recommend Haspel's confirmation by the full Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Panel Approves Gina Haspel As CIA Chief; Confirmation Appears Likely

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP