First Amendment First Amendment

This April 3 photo, taken in Washington, DC, shows President Donald Trump's Twitter feed. Some Twitter users argue Trump is violating the First Amendment by blocking people from his feed after they posted negative comments. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. David Ake/AP

First Amendment Advocates Charge Trump Can't Block Critics On Twitter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562619874/562619875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anti-Trump protesters chant during an Inauguration Day demonstration in Washington, D.C., in January. A judge has narrowed the Justice Department's warrant for records related to a website used to plan protests. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Football players on the Watkins Mill High Wolverines take a knee during the playing of the National Anthem before a game against the Damascus Hornets at Damascus High School in Damascus, Md. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images
NurPhoto/Getty Images

Study Looks At How People Think About Free Speech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/549373754/549373755" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

White nationalist Richard Spencer's free speech fight against Google, Facebook and other tech companies has some unlikely support from the left. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Unlikely Allies Join Fight To Protect Free Speech On The Internet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545320833/545435119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Department of Justice has issued a warrant for a web hosting company to turn over all records related to the website of #DisruptJ20, a group that organized actions to spoil President Trump's inauguration in January. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Following the weekend's violent clashes around a white nationalist demonstration in Charlottesville, Va., some are asking what authorities could have done differently. Above, demonstrators and counter-protestors face off at the entrance to Emancipation Park during Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Vice Media co-founder and conservative speaker Gavin McInnes reads a speech written by Ann Coulter to a crowd during a conservative rally in Berkeley, Calif., on April 27. Coulter canceled a planned appearance at the University of California, Berkeley, saying she had lost the backing of the groups that had sponsored her talk. Josh Edelson /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson /AFP/Getty Images

States Consider Legislation To Protect Free Speech On Campus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527092506/527092507" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Simon Tam, a member of the band The Slants, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Russell/NPR

Supreme Court Considers Trademark Battle Over Band Name

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510472450/510472452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A gunman's appearance at a Washington, D.C., pizzeria that was falsely reported to house a pedophilia ring has elevated worries over the unrelenting rise of fake news on the Internet. Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

What Legal Recourse Do Victims Of Fake News Stories Have?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504723649/504723650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds up a Bible that was given to him by his mother as he speaks during the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 25, 2015. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

What Does Trump's Promise Of A Nation 'Under One God' Really Mean?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494367803/494377369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The University of Chicago informed incoming students in a welcome letter it does not support "trigger warnings" or "safe spaces," as part of its policy of free speech. Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis via Getty Images

University Of Chicago Tells Freshmen It Does Not Support 'Trigger Warnings'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491531869/491531870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Jacobson/AP

In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468308775/468309237" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

University of Missouri students circle tents on the Carnahan Quadrangle, locking arms to prevent media from entering the space following the resignation of President Timothy Wolfe on Monday. Robert Cohen/TNS/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Cohen/TNS/Landov