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Ugaaso Boocow is back — and instagramming — in her homeland of Somalia. Courtesy of Ugaaso A. Boocow hide caption

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Courtesy of Ugaaso A. Boocow

Her Instagram Feed Finds The Fun In Long-Suffering Somalia

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Customers wait to collect money at the Juba Express money transfer company in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Feb. 12. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Terrorism Fears Complicate Money Transfers For Somali-Americans

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Somali-American youths play basketball before the start of a September 2013 solidarity rally by the Minneapolis Somali community to denounce al-Shabab's attack of a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Less than a decade after groups of teens from Minneapolis emigrated to Somalia to join the terrorist group, more have been recruited to join the self-declared Islamic State in Syria. Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov

For Somalis In Minneapolis, Jihadi Recruiting Is A Recurring Nightmare

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Somali journalist Yusuf Ahmed Abukar used the radio to tell stories of the poor and suffering in Somalia — and to criticize militant groups and the government. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

Listen to One of Abukar's Stories (It's in Somali)

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Yemeni soldiers hold up their weapons at an area seized from al-Qaida in the southeastern province of Shabwa, Yemen, on May 8. President Obama said Wednesday that U.S. strategy against the so-called Islamic State would be similar to how it targeted militants in Yemen and Somalia. Yemen's Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

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Yemen's Defense Ministry/AP

A money changer sits behind piles of banknotes in Hargeisa in Somaliland, an autonomous, relatively peaceful region in northern Somalia. The self-declared nation of Somaliland, like Somalia itself, lacks a formal banking system, and residents rely on hawaladars to receive money from abroad. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

As Wire Transfer Options Dwindle, Somali-Americans Fear A Lost Lifeline

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Chief Warrant Officer Michael Durant, wounded when the helicopter he was piloting was shot down in Somalia, arrives at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, on Oct. 16, 1993. He was held captive for 11 days. Joe Marquette/AP hide caption

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Joe Marquette/AP