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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Drop-In Chefs Help Seniors Stay In Their Own Homes

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Celebrity chef Giada De Laurentiis during a guest appearance on ABC's The Chew last fall. She can cook rich foods and keep her trim figure, but new research suggests that's a difficult feat for amateur cooks watching along at home. Lou Rocco/ABC/Getty Images hide caption

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Lou Rocco/ABC/Getty Images

Do TV Cooking Shows Make Us Fat?

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Chef David Iott explains the perfect way to prepare risotto to Stanford students. Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises hide caption

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Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises

One reason cooking at home might be linked to poor health? Researchers say it could be because there are too many unhealthful baked goods coming out of the oven. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption

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Amriphoto/iStockphoto

Roasted pineapple Alan Richardson /Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Alan Richardson /Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays

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Amateur cook and writer Maureen Evans has perfected the art of tweeting a recipe in 140 characters or less. fot. Wojciech Zalewski/iStockphoto hide caption

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fot. Wojciech Zalewski/iStockphoto

Tweet In The Holiday With Recipes On Twitter

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True cheddar cheese can take months — even years — to age. So Claudia Lucero created a faux-cheddar that can be made in very little time. fotolia hide caption

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How To Make A Faux Cheddar In One Hour

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The Romanesco broccoli in the upper left corner is part of the brassica family, just like these colorful cauliflower varieties. Sang An/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Sang An/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press