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U.S. Constitution

A large crowd of women cheers a speaker at the Lincoln Memorial, during a rally for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

50 years ago sex equality seemed destined for the Constitution. What happened?

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Attorney General Merrick Garland, in a 2021 photo, said a Missouri gun rights law impedes law enforcement in the state. The Department of Justice sued Wednesday to enjoin the law. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The growing discontent within the National Guard

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The preamble to the US Constitution. Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty

Federal lawmakers introduced an joint resolution that seeks "to prohibit the use of slavery and involuntary servitude as a punishment for a crime" under the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. bonniej/Getty Images hide caption

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bonniej/Getty Images

A traffic enforcement officer chalks tires in Arvada, Colo., in 2014. Physically marking a tire without a warrant is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, a federal appeals court ruled. Kent Nishimura/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Denver Post via Getty Images

After opening shortly before the 2016 election, the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., has quickly became a favorite gathering place for the president's supporters. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Federal Lawsuit Against President Trump's Business Interests Allowed To Proceed

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A lawsuit brought by the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia regarding President Trump's profits from the Trump International Hotel near the White House can proceed, a federal judge has ruled. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

After he received a C on a paper when he was 19, Gregory Watson went on a mission to get a constitutional amendment ratified. Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT hide caption

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Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

The Bad Grade That Changed The U.S. Constitution

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Attorney Bob Hilliard — representing the family of Mexican teenager Sergio Adrian Hernandez, who was shot and killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent — speaks in front of the Supreme Court after presenting his argument on Tuesday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Conservative Justices Skeptical Of Extending Constitution Beyond U.S. Border

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Two teams face off in a debate over the extent of the president's war powers at the latest debate from Intelligence Squared U.S. Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Has The President Exceeded His War Powers Authority?

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Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

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George Washington is depicted addressing the Constitutional Convention of 1787 in this painting by Junius Brutus Stearns. Presumably, no representative from Rhode Island is in the picture; Rhode Island boycotted the gathering and originally rejected the Constitution. AP hide caption

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AP

The U.S. Supreme Court, 70 years after rejecting Roscoe Filburn's bid to limit the federal government's power to regulate commerce. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Farmer And The Commerce Clause

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Member of the House read the Constitution

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