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Spam phone calls are the No. 1 consumer complaint at the Federal Communications Commission. Seventy percent of people no longer answer calls they don't recognize, according to Consumer Reports. smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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'Do I Know You?' And Other Spam Phone Calls We Can't Get Rid Of

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Andrew Gillum, the Democratic candidate for Florida governor, speaks Friday during a campaign rally in Orlando. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Election Is Latest Target Of White Supremacist Robocalls

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The NYPD has received 30 complaints from people who have lost money to a Chinese-language robocall scam. Ja_inter/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Ja_inter/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Chinese Robocalls Bombarding The U.S. Are Part Of An International Phone Scam

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Telemarketers are prohibited from making prerecorded phone calls to people without prior consent. It's also illegal to deliberately falsify caller ID with the intent to harm or defraud consumers. PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock

Nearly a dozen years since the federal Do Not Call Registry took effect, automated calling systems have exploded. iStockphoto hide caption

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Why It's Hard To Put An End To Unwanted Robocalls

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When you answer your phone and there's no one on the other end, it could be a computer that's gathering information about you and your bank account. Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images

Why Phone Fraud Starts With A Silent Call

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