American manufacturing American manufacturing

MedStar Health clinic in Washington, D.C. An affiliated MedStar hospital is just one of many facilities throughout the U.S. that have been hit with shortages of certain medications because of recent hurricane damage to manufacturers in Puerto Rico. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Hurricane Damage To Manufacturers In Puerto Rico Affects Mainland Hospitals, Too

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Labs are now churning out large white diamonds that are indistinguishable from those found in nature. The diamond on the left is lab-grown, while the uncut version of the one on the right was created by millions of years of intense pressure. Michael Rubenstein for NPR hide caption

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Michael Rubenstein for NPR

Lab-Grown Diamonds Come Into Their Own

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Nissan workers at a plant in Canton, Miss. The auto company received financial incentives, including tax relief, from the state for the factory. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

A Backlash Brews Against Low Pay On The Factory Floor

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Fashion designer Natalie Chanin stands in front of in-progress garments at the Alabama Chanin Factory. Chanin and Billy Reid, internationally acclaimed designers, have teamed up to test the concept of organic, sustainable cotton farming and garment-making. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Reviving A Southern Industry, From Cotton Field To Clothing Rack

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Every week, Robert Stout of Kings County Jerky slices meat by hand. Adam Lerner/adamlerner.net hide caption

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Adam Lerner/adamlerner.net

A Revival In American Manufacturing, Led By Brooklyn Foodies

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President Obama tours Conveyor Engineering and Manufacturing in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Wednesday. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Taking His Economic Message On The Road, Obama Touts Factory Jobs In Iowa

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Woodside Cotton Mill in Simpsonville, SC employed 622 people early in 1988. In 1989, the mill closed. It was recently converted into condominiums. scmikeburton/Flickr hide caption

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scmikeburton/Flickr