Terrorism Terrorism

Iraqi government forces flash a victory sign while holding an upside-down Islamic State flag in western Mosul on June 9. As ISIS loses territory, it's still exhorting its supporters to keep fighting. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images

As ISIS Gets Squeezed In Syria And Iraq, It's Using Music As A Weapon

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Facebook has created new tools for trying to keep terrorist content off the site. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Facebook Uses Technology To Block Terrorist-Related Content

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A police officer in Montreal guards the front of an apartment building, where Amor Ftouhi lived before traveling to the U.S. earlier this month. Ftouhi, a Canadian resident, is suspected of stabbing an airport police officer in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. The FBI said it is investigating it as an "act of terrorism." Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

When Is It 'Terrorism'? How The Media Cover Attacks By Muslim Perpetrators

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Smoke billows from the Marawi city center after an air attack by Philippine government troops on May 30. Philippine government troops have been battling ISIS-linked militants. Jes Aznar/Getty Images hide caption

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Jes Aznar/Getty Images

Londoners stand behind a cordon in the East Ham district on Sunday, following a police raid investigating Saturday's terror attacks in Central London. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

A woman lays flowers for the victims of the Manchester Arena attack in central Manchester, England, on Tuesday. Darren Staples/Reuters hide caption

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Darren Staples/Reuters

Manchester Bombing Is Europe's 13th Terrorist Attack Since 2015

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People attend a vigil in Albert Square in Manchester, after the city in northwest England absorbed the worst terror attack on U.K. soil since 2005. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Manchester Concert Bombing: What We Know Tuesday

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A pilot prepares to launch an unmanned aerial vehicle from a ground control station earlier this year. The Air Force is moving to treat psychological stress faced by remote pilots and analysts a little more like the effects of traditional warfare. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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The Warfare May Be Remote But The Trauma Is Real

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James Harris Jackson is escorted out of a police precinct in New York on March 22. Police said Jackson, accused of fatally stabbing a black man in New York City, told investigators he traveled from Baltimore specifically to attack black people. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

People lay floral tributes to the victims of the March 22 terror attack in Parliament Square outside the Houses of Parliament in central London. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images

Keeping Calm In London, In Spite Of Terror

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Imam Johari Abdul-Malik (center), of Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Northern Virginia, speaks alongside other leaders of the Muslim community during a December 2015 news conference in Washington, D.C., about growing "Islamophobia" in the United States. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Push To Name Muslim Brotherhood A Terrorist Group Worries U.S. Offshoots

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A flower left in tribute to the victims of Wednesday's attack is seen next to the Palace of Westminster that houses the Houses of Parliament in central London. Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images