Internet privacy Internet privacy

The Department of Justice has narrowed the scope of a warrant it served to web hosting company DreamHost. The government has demanded information about DisruptJ20.org, a website used to organize protests in Washington, D.C., during the Inauguration in January. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Department of Justice has issued a warrant for a web hosting company to turn over all records related to the website of #DisruptJ20, a group that organized actions to spoil President Trump's inauguration in January. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Google has announced it will no longer scan users' emails to target ads. Above, the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A now-deleted tweet from @ALT_USCIS was included in a complaint Twitter filed against the Department of Homeland Security. Twitter says DHS tried to unmask the user behind this account, which has "expressed dissent in a range of different ways," including this early tweet that "the author apparently believed cast doubt on the Administration's immigration policy." Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California hide caption

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Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California

Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit is moving to soften his predecessor's sweeping privacy rules for Internet service providers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Pixsooz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Cryptoparties Teach Attendees How To Stay Anonymous Online

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Author Tim Wu says that much of the content on the Internet is created by businesses that are on a "quest for clicks." PeopleImages.com/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages.com/Getty Images

How Free Web Content Traps People In An Abyss Of Ads And Clickbait

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FBI Director James Comey said this week at Ohio's Kenyon College that "I saw something in the news, so I copied it. I put a piece of tape — I have obviously a laptop, personal laptop — I put a piece of tape over the camera. Because I saw somebody smarter than I am had a piece of tape over their camera." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says the right to be forgotten online is "a very bad solution to a real problem." Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

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