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Former House Speaker John Boehner voted to prohibit medical marijuana as a U.S. congressman from Ohio in 1999, but he came out in support of some uses of cannabis on Wednesday. Lauren Victoria Burke/AP hide caption

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Lauren Victoria Burke/AP

Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

Kate Murphy felt frustrated by a lack of advice from doctors on how to use medical marijuana to mitigate side effects from her cancer treatment. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

MaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from the opioid painkillers she was prescribed for chronic nerve pain. "I felt tired all the time and I was still in pain," she says. Marijuana works better for her, but costs $200 per month out-of-pocket. Emily Corwin/VPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/VPR

The High Cost Of Medical Marijuana Causes Pain In Vermont

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Celebrations that include loud fireworks often terrify dogs. Though there's not yet much science to confirm it, some veterinarians and pet owners say CBD, an extract of hemp or marijuana, can ease a pet's fear. Francisco Goncalves/Getty hide caption

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Francisco Goncalves/Getty

Researchers have found marijuana metabolites in the urine of babies who were exposed to adult marijuana use. deux/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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deux/Corbis/Getty Images

Doctors Say Parents Shouldn't Smoke Pot Around Kids

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A marijuana plant is displayed during the 2016 Cannabis Business Summit & Expo on Jun. 22 in Oakland, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

City Of Oakland Considers Ways To Share In Pot Profits

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Lisa Olson, of Mesa, Ariz., uses marijuana to ease the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

Marijuana's Mainstream Move Triggers Different Kinds Of Family Talks

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In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

A strain of high-cannabidiol marijuana is used to create extracts used in experimental epilepsy treatments. GW Pharmaceuticals hide caption

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GW Pharmaceuticals

Marijuana Extract May Help Some Children With Epilepsy, Study Finds

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton responds to a question from Roland Martin, host of TV One's News One Now, during a town hall meeting at Claflin University in Orangeburg, S.C., Richard Burkhart/AP Images for TV One hide caption

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Richard Burkhart/AP Images for TV One

Ohio's proposal to legalize recreational and medical marijuana is being met with opposition from residents who generally support legalizing pot. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Fears Of Marijuana 'Monopoly' In Ohio Undercut Support For Legalization

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Cover art from Stoned. Current hide caption

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Current

When Weed Is The Cure: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana

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Marijuana at a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Using chemicals to control bugs or mold is common among commercial cannabis growers. But with no federal oversight, experts are concerned growers may be using dangerous pesticides. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Concern Grows Over Unregulated Pesticide Use Among Marijuana Growers

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A marijuana bud displayed in Denver. Don't legalize pot, the pediatricians say, but don't lock teenagers up for using it, either. Seth McConnell/The Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Seth McConnell/The Denver Post/Getty Images