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Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency Yukiya Amano at a meeting of the agency's board of governors in Vienna last year. The agency announced Amano's death on Monday. Ronald Zak/AP hide caption

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Ronald Zak/AP

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe waves to well-wishers on his departure from Tokyo's Haneda Airport on Wednesday for a two-day visit to Iran. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Ed Perlmutter shakes hands with Carlyn Meyer and other members of the groups J-Street and MoveOn.org as they urge him to support the Iran nuclear deal at an event in Denver. J-Street plans to spend about $5 million on ads in this fight, which is vastly dwarfed by the $20 million to $40 million from groups like AIPAC that oppose the agreement. Jason Bahr/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Bahr/Getty Images

Lobbyists Spending Millions To Sway The Undecided On Iran Deal

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Secretary of State John Kerry spoke with NPR's Steve Inskeep at the State Department. Kerry said if Congress or a future president reverses a nuclear control agreement with Iran, U.S. credibility will suffer. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

U.S. Will Lose 'All Credibility' If Congress Rejects Nuclear Deal, Kerry Says

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Iranian workers transfer goods from a cargo container to trucks in May at the Kalantari port in Chabahar, Iran. The removal of sanctions on Iran under a recent deal with world powers is expected to boost the country's economy, but the agreement was carefully constructed to quickly put those sanctions back in place if Iran is suspected of violations. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

A Look At How Sanctions Would 'Snap Back' If Iran Violates Nuke Deal

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Interview: Israeli Prime Minister Bejamin Netanyahu On Iran Nuclear Deal

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President Obama hosts leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council at Camp David, Md., on May 14. The president gave assurances that the U.S. would support its allies in the region concerned over Iran's growing influence. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Iran Nuclear Pact Could Spark Buildup Of Conventional Weapons

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Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., center, and the committee's ranking member Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., right, were all smiles April 14 after the committee passed an agreement on oversight of Iran negotiations. But the bill has run into some outspoken opponents in the full Senate. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Full Senate Debates May Reveal Recent Bipartisanship As An Illusion

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