Medicaid Medicaid
Stories About

Medicaid

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, speaks to state legislators in 2018. Bevin, who is running for re-election this fall, asked the federal government to impose work requirements on many people who receive Medicaid. Bevin's predecessor, a Democrat, did not seek these requirements when he expanded the program under the Affordable Care Act. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy D. Easley/AP

Leah Steimel (center) says she would consider buying insurance through a Medicaid-style plan that the New Mexico Legislature is considering. Her family includes (from left) her husband, Wellington Guzman; their daughter, Amelia; and sons Daniel and Jonathan. Courtesy of Leah Steimel hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Leah Steimel

Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

toggle caption
Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695687400/695929673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson announces changes to the state Medicaid program called Arkansas Works, including the addition of a work requirement for certain beneficiaries, on March 6, 2017. Michael Hibblen/KUAR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Hibblen/KUAR

In Arkansas, Thousands Of People Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Over New Work Rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/694504586/695756054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. John Dingell was seated next to President Barack Obama when he signed the Affordable Care Act into law at the White House on March 23, 2010. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671159555/680021724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The "Medicaid Drug Decisions Transparency Act" would require pharmaceutical companies to disclose their payments to pharmacists and others who serve on state Medicaid drug boards — the advisory groups that decide which drugs Medicaid will and won't cover. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Planned Parenthood opened its new headquarters in Washington, D.C., in September. The Supreme Court declined to take up a key case, a big win for the organization. Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668663222/671285344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, warned that failure of a Medicaid-funding initiative on the ballot could make for a tough legislative session in 2019. William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

"Most of us are ecstatic" about Medicaid expansion in Utah, said Grant Burningham, of Bountiful. "We were all together and hugging and kissing last night." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kim Raff for NPR

A Winning Idea: Medicaid Expansion Prevails In Idaho, Nebraska And Utah

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/664661676/665885684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amanda Cahill, a supporter of Montana's tobacco tax measure, I-185, at a press conference near the state capitol last August. Tobacco firms have spent $17 million in opposition to the initiative, compared to an $8 million campaign by those in favor of it. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Big Tobacco Spends Big To Block A Tax And Medicaid Expansion In Montana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662176822/664103276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Grant Burningham, who lives in Bountiful, Utah, worked to get a referendum on Medicaid expansion on the Utah ballot in November. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kim Raff for NPR

Voters In 4 States Set To Decide On Medicaid Expansion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/659452120/662464317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Organizers with Idahoans for Healthcare have been driving this green vehicle around the state to campaign for Medicaid expansion. Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

When one of Jose Nuñez's retinas was damaged by diabetes in 2016, the Los Angeles truck driver expected his Medicaid managed care policy to coordinate treatment. But Centene, the private insurer that manages his policy, gave him the runaround, he says, and he lost sight in that eye. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/KHN

Massachusetts wanted to negotiate prices and stop the use of some of the most expensive drugs in its Medicaid program. The federal government said no. Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Marotta/Getty Images

"We would not be able to foster without Medicaid," says Sherri Croom of Tallahassee, Fla. Croom and her husband, Thomas, have fostered 27 children in the past decade. They're pictured here with four adopted children, two 18-year-old former foster daughters and those daughters' sons. Courtesy of the Croom family hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Croom family

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, is eager to preserve an expansion of Medicaid that he pushed through, despite opposition from other members of his party. Ron Schwane/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ron Schwane/AP

Texas officials are requiring that people who comment at Medicaid meetings on pharmaceuticals disclose more details about their ties to industry. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Rose/Getty Images