Medicaid Medicaid

In 2015, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announced that the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services had approved the state's waiver to try a different approach for Medicaid. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

At the Grace Community Health Center in Manchester, Ky., psychologist Joan Nantz meets with patient Ramiro Salazar, who gained Medicaid under the expansion. Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Phil Galewitz/Kaiser Health News

Nick Fugate (center) with his parents, Julie and Ron, has been adjusting to life on Kansas' waiting list to get life-assistance services through Medicaid. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

To Get Disability Help In Kansas, Thousands Face A 7-Year Wait

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California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a Medicaid expansion into law as part of the state's budget authorization in 2013. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

What Happens To Medicaid In California Under A Trump Administration?

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Intensive home-visits by physical, occupational and speech therapists have been "a lifesaver," for little Haylee Crouse, her mom Amanda (left) told Shots. Haylee, who is now 2, developed seizures and physical and intellectual disabilities after contracting meningitis when she was 8 days old. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Wade Goodwyn/NPR

Cuts In Texas Medicaid Hit Rural Kids With Disabilities Especially Hard

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Hygienist Beth Rowan cleans the teeth of Lindsay Klecker, 31, who has cerebral palsy and a seizure disorder. Rowan works at the Marshfield Clinic in Chippewa Falls, Wis. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Getting Dental Care Can Be A Challenge For People With Disabilities

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Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Burns/Getty Images

Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

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State lawmakers in West Virginia say their budget choices are only getting tougher. About a third of state residents are on Medicaid. OZinOH/Flickr hide caption

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OZinOH/Flickr

West Virginia Grapples With High Drug Costs

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A number of states recently have dedicated more money to educating women and health care providers about the 99 percent effectiveness of long-acting, reversible forms of contraception, like the intrauterine device, or IUD — shown here. Michael Tomsic/WFAE hide caption

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Michael Tomsic/WFAE

Long-Term, Reversible Contraception Gains Traction With Young Women

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Construction of Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro, N.C., was partially funded by the Hill-Burton Act. The hospital, seen circa 1973, was at the center of a court case, Simkins v. Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, that brought an end to racially segregated health care. Cone Health Medical Library hide caption

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Cone Health Medical Library

Eliminating disparities in cancer care requires more than just expanding Medicaid coverage, say cancer epidemiologists who found that patients with private insurance seemed to have a survival advantage. Thomas Barwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

When used in conjunction with counseling, Suboxone strips placed under the tongue can help ease opioid cravings and other withdrawal symptoms in people trying to quit a heroin or painkiller habit, doctors say. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Insurance Rules Can Hamper Recovery From Opioid Addiction

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Josephine Rudolph, 99, says she couldn't afford to live at the Joyce Eisenberg Keefer Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility in Reseda, Calif., without Medi-Cal assistance. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News