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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

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Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

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Alex Azar, who was deputy secretary for Health and Human Services in the George W. Bush administration, is President Trump's pick to replace Dr. Tom Price as head of the department. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Picks Alex Azar To Lead Health And Human Services

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Rosemary Warnock, a registered nurse at Maine Health, exits the Merrill Auditorium voting station in Portland, Maine, early Tuesday. She said she was motivated to vote for Medicaid expansion. Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images

After Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Governor Raises Objections

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Kathleen Phelps, who lacks health insurance, speaks in favor of expanding Medicaid at a news conference in Portland, Maine on Oct. 13, 2016. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

When Ohio voters head to the polls Tuesday, they'll be able to weigh in on a ballot measure that aims to get better drug prices for state programs. Jay LaPrete/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay LaPrete/Getty Images

Neal Siegel, who lives with his girlfriend, Beth Wargo, is one of six disabled Iowans suing the state over its privatized Medicaid program. Clay Masters/IPR hide caption

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Clay Masters/IPR

Patients, Health Insurers Challenge Iowa's Effort To Privatize Medicaid

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Hepatitis C virus, via transmission electron microscopy. (The actual viral diameter is around 22 nm.) Doctors say the recent FDA approval of Mavyret, a less expensive drug for treating the virus, may make it easier for more insurers and correctional facilities to expand treatment. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, center, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., have a plan to renew funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which lapsed Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Blend Images/Getty Images

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF