Medicaid Medicaid

Confused about whether your health plan is ACA-compliant? To be sure you're using your state's official marketplace, start with HealthCare.gov, and click on "see if I can change." Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced federal approval for changes to Indiana's Medicaid program Friday in Indianapolis. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-Gov. Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had approved Indiana's waiver to experiment with Medicaid requirements. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Patients with a history of polyps who need more subsequent tests may have to pick up some of those costs. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

The revelation that a favorite uncle had died from a long-hidden drug habit shook Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky to his core. Last month Ostrovksy quit his job as Medicaid's chief medical officer and joined a group that's working to dispel the shame of addiction. Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images

A sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. Tuesday's special election puts decisions over how the state funds Medicaid in voters' hands. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

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Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, at a White House press conference in May. More people moving off Medicaid, she says, would be a good outcome. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

New Rules May Make Getting And Staying On Medicaid More Difficult

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, led efforts to require work for Medicaid recipients while in charge of Indiana's program. She was sworn in as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services by Vice President Pence on March 14. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Will Let States Require People To Work For Medicaid

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Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR