Medicaid Medicaid

Johnny Reynolds ignored diabetes symptoms and put off going to the doctor for years when he didn't have health insurance. He was afraid he couldn't afford treatment. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anders Kelto/NPR

States That Expand Medicaid Detect More Cases Of Diabetes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394836516/394906641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When Alexis Paige lost her job, she was afraid she would have to discontinue her estrogen treatments. That can't happen now under the Oregon Health Plan. Cree Jude Gordon/Courtesy Alexis Paige hide caption

toggle caption
Cree Jude Gordon/Courtesy Alexis Paige

In Oregon, Medicaid Now Covers Transgender Medical Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/376154299/376381110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is giving Medicaid expansion another try. Matt Volz/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Volz/AP

As Heard On Morning Edition

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/375315937/375390926" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gov. Bill Haslam announces his proposal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee on Dec. 15. Under the plan, the hospital association would pay the state's portion of the program. Erik Schelzig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Erik Schelzig/AP

Tennessee's Medicaid Deal Dodges A Partisan Fight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/373564985/373587981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donna Giron wheels through the halls of the nursing home she's lived in since May. Finding an affordable home of her own has been difficult. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

When Home And Health Are Just Out Of Reach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/369397959/372940293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Valerie Davidson was appointed health commissioner by Alaska's Gov. Bill Walker to help him expand Medicaid in the state. She'll look for middle ground with Republicans to get it done, she says. Lori Townsend/Alaska Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Lori Townsend/Alaska Public Media

Alaska's Governor Eager To Expand Medicaid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/370979687/371126252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andres Cuartas got help from an agent last March when he signed up for health insurance at a Miami mall. In the last year, the percentage of women who are uninsured has dropped more than the percentage of uninsured men. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Health Law's Big Tent Still Leaves Some People Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368239989/368408291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One rationale for extending Medicaid coverage to more people is to help them get to a doctor or clinic before a minor illness becomes a medical emergency. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Among heroin addicts who are able to quit, 40 to 60 percent relapse within the first year — many within the first weeks of release from a treatment program. Diane Diederich/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Diane Diederich/iStockphoto

Recovery Coach Helps An Addict Resist Heroin's Lure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/332352845/339375001" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arkansas, Kentucky, Delaware and Colorado have all seen significant increases since 2013 in the percentage of residents who have health insurance. Vectoraart/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Vectoraart/iStockphoto

Numbers Of Americans With Health Plans Way Up, But States Vary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/338015724/338099779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript