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Tara Lang was pregnant with her daughter when her fiance was killed in a motorcycle crash. A pregnancy center in Metairie, La., helped her sign up for Medicaid coverage. Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO hide caption

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Jessica Rosgaard/WWNO

How Crisis Pregnancy Center Clients Rely On Medicaid

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The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

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Lee Cantrell, an associate professor of clinical pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, with a collection of vintage expired medications. Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for ProPublica

That Drug Expiration Date May Be More Myth Than Fact

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. Without insurance, the daily medications he needs to stay healthy could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more each year. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Massachusetts, Proposed Medicaid Cuts Put Kids' Health Care At Risk

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A mountain of mine tailings frame a Bisbee park — a legacy of the copper mines that once fueled the local economy. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Doctor Shortage In Rural Arizona Sparks Another Crisis In 'Forgotten America'

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There's a severe shortage of professional mental health care providers in Texas. Peer specialists — certified and paid — have begun to bridge the gap. Texas is one of more than 35 states that finance peer services through Medicaid. Martin Barraud/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Barraud/Getty Images

In Texas, People With Mental Illness Are Finding Work Helping Peers

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A survey of Medicaid beneficiaries found that overall, they're very happy with the services they get and have no problems finding doctors. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

Survey Says: Medicaid Recipients Really Like Their Coverage And Care

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A provision in the bill proposed by the GOP Senate would permit Medicaid to pay for longer stints of inpatient psychiatric care. But other parts of the bill would strip $772 billion from Medicaid — the single-largest funder of care for people who have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another serious mental illness. B. Boissonnet/Getty Images hide caption

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B. Boissonnet/Getty Images

Steve Daines of Montana (right) talks with fellow Republican Sens. Mitch McConnell and Pat Roberts in a White House meeting in June on the GOP health care strategy, which would include deep cuts to Medicaid. Montana insurers say the plan worries them. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Montana Insurers Say Medicaid Cuts Would Drive Up Cost Of Private Health Plans

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