College football College football
Stories About

College football

University of Maryland President Wallace Loh, seen here in August, said Tuesday that he will retire in June 2019. Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post/Getty Images

North Texas Mean Green wide receiver Keegan Brewer returns a punt for a touchdown on a fake fair catch. Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Opinion: A Very Winning Play?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/650567738/650698331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jordan McNair, seen playing high school football in 2016, died on June 13, 2018, two weeks after collapsing during a University of Maryland team workout. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

University of Maryland President Wallace Loh speaks at a news conference about the death of student athlete Jordan McNair, who collapsed at football practice and later died. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Perched on McFarland Boulevard in Tuscaloosa, home of the Alabama Crimson Tide, a new billboard bought by UCF fans lays down the gauntlet — which, it must be noted, is all but assured of not being picked up. Travis Reier hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Reier

Texas A&M is holding an auction and a lottery to determine who can stay at a new hotel that's being built across from the school's football stadium. Here, the facility is seen in an artist's rendering. Texas A&M hide caption

toggle caption
Texas A&M

Wide receiver Hunter Renfrow of the Clemson Tigers celebrates with wide receiver Deon Cain after a 24-yard touchdown pass in Monday night's championship game. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Alabama running back Derrick Henry celebrates with teammates and reporters after the College Football Playoff national championship game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Clemson Tigers last January. Icon Sports Wire/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Icon Sports Wire/Corbis via Getty Images

The Case Against The College Football Playoff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507089687/507208633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the University of Tennessee grounds crew paint the "Battle at Bristol" logo on the football field at Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tenn. Earl Neikirk/Bristol Herald Courier via AP Images hide caption

toggle caption
Earl Neikirk/Bristol Herald Courier via AP Images

John Castello decided to stop playing football when he learned about the risks of brain injury. Dave Marmarelli/DGM Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Dave Marmarelli/DGM Photography

The Impact Of 'Concussion': High School Football Player Changes Course

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468284026/468366669" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tight end O.J. Howard of the Alabama Crimson Tide scores a 53-yard touchdown Monday in the third quarter against the Clemson Tigers during the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship Game in Glendale, Ariz. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

"Osceola" stands in front of a crowd at the FSU homecoming game. Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune hide caption

toggle caption
Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456786680/457708698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sister Lisa Maurer, nun and kicking coach for the College of St. Scholastica football team, watches during drills in October. Derek Montgomery for MPR News hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Montgomery for MPR News

Meet The College Football Coach Who Really Knows Her Hail Marys

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456827354/456904271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arkansas running back Jonathan Williams had just scored a touchdown against Missouri last season when he dropped the ball and raised his hands in a hands up, don't shoot" gesture. L.G. Patterson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
L.G. Patterson/AP

A Deep-Rooted History Of Activism Stirs In College Football

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455462047/455510066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this Sept. 15, 1930, photo, coach Knute Rockne puts his football proteges through the first football drill of the season at Cartier Field, South Bend, Ind. Rockne finished his career with an .860 winning percentage and delivered the famous "Win one for the Gipper" speech. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Football, Notre Dame And Winning 'For The Gipper'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/446353795/446499581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Columbia University players watch hopefully as they take on Fordham University. Despite a good start, the game ended in a loss for the Lions. Amy Pearl/WNYC hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Pearl/WNYC

An Ivy, A New Coach And A Perfectly Terrible Football Record

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/443094729/443200374" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript