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Thanksgiving

While your holiday meal might consist of turkey that's deep-fried, braised or roasted, the turkeys who've been featured in music through the years have inspired pop culture crazes. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

'Let's Turkey Trot': Festive Music About Fowl

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'Thank You, America': A Crowdsourced Holiday Poem That's A Blessing To Read

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At MOM-O's Thanksgiving Memorial Brunch, family members can light a candle in honor of their lost loved one. In its 25 years, the organization has supported hundreds of families in Charlotte through the loss of a relative after a homicide. Adhiti Bandlamudi/WUNC hide caption

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Adhiti Bandlamudi/WUNC

A Thanksgiving Feast With Space At The Table For Grief

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A holiday mug is seen among the wreckage of what was once someone's kitchen in Paradise, California. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Thousands Of Fire Evacuees To Spend The Holiday Without Homes

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Hydrochar derived from poultry waste was produced in a lab at Ben-Gurion University in Israel. The hydrochar can be made into briquettes, which can be used as charcoal for cooking food. Juliana Neumann hide caption

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Juliana Neumann

Grabbing turkey legs to gnaw on might be taboo at some tables and encouraged at others. But whatever your Thanksgiving traditions, they're all yours. Evans/Getty Images hide caption

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Evans/Getty Images

Though the filling is not actually totally transparent, the name of the pie has stuck around since it first appeared in Kentucky newspapers in the 1890s. J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL hide caption

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J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL

By 1495, Christopher Columbus was in trouble. The riches he had imagined finding in Asia were not materializing in the New World, and the costs of his voyages were mounting. Sending indigenous people back to Europe as slaves became his solution. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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An American Secret: The Untold Story Of Native American Enslavement

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Drumstick and Wishbone, the National Thanksgiving Turkey and its alternate "wingman," are introduced Monday during an event hosted by The National Turkey Federation at the Williard InterContinental in Washington, D.C. One of the 40-pound fowl will be presented to President Trump at the White House on Tuesday, when he will ceremoniously "pardon" it. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images